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US Attorney General Jeff Sessions – “How To Spot A Stoner”

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CBE Top 100 list 2017 https://www.cannabisbusinessexecutive.com/2016/06/cannabis-business-executive-100-top-ancillary-businesses/?utm_source=CBE+Master+List&utm_campaign=04a6a9736f-2017+CBE+Ancillary+Business+list+Survey&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1f64189714-04a6a9736f-264218709

https://www.cannabisbusinessexecutive.com/2016/06/cannabis-business-executive-100-top-ancillary-businesses/?utm_source=CBE+Master+List&utm_campaign=04a6a9736f-2017+CBE+Ancillary+Business+list+Survey&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1f64189714-04a6a9736f-264218709

 


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Canada currently has 428 companies applying to become licensed cannabis producers “LPs”

https://news.vice.com/story/canada-just-made-it-easier-to-produce-legal-medical-weed

Canada just made it easier to produce legal medical weed

Canada just made it a lot easier for companies to get licenses to produce medical marijuana — something industry experts predict will significantly boost the country’s cannabis supply and potentially result in hundreds of new companies entering the system ahead of the legal recreational market next year.

There are currently 428 companies in the queue applying to become licensed cannabis producers (or “LPs”).On Friday, Health Canada announced in a news release it had streamlined the notoriously lengthy and rigorous application process to become an LP. The new measures will “enable increased production,” the department stated. Since the licensing program came into effect in 2013, there have been 45 medical marijuana production licenses granted, the most recent of which was granted this week.

“I do see this as a game-changer, a significant development that will impact the cannabis sector overall,” said David Hyde, a security consultant who has worked with 155 LP applicants, including 18 that have been granted licenses.

The approvals process has picked up this year, with one or two companies getting licenses every month. Currently, only patients with valid medical prescriptions can legally get cannabis in dried or oil form from one of these LPs, through the mail. Otherwise, they can apply to grow their own.

“The world is going to explode in terms of the opportunities.”

The changes announced by Health Canada include hiring new staff to help speed up the application process that can sometimes take more than a year, removing the cap that prevented LPs from growing more than a certain amount, as long as it’s within the capacity of their vaults. And the companies now have more freedom to modify and expand their facilities.

Many licensed producers have lamented the layers of bureaucracy required to get a license, including extensive criminal background checks of those in charge, as well as costly security infrastructure requirements.

Hyde predicts that a significant number of the applicants in waiting will be granted licenses in short order because of the revamped procedures. And even though these are all medical licenses for now, he added the changes are clearly to help the industry get prepared for the significant recreational demand to come. A report released by Deloitte predicts Canada’s recreational market could be worth billions.

Once the Liberal government’s recreational cannabis law comes into effect likely sometime next year, these companies are slated to be at the helm of the supply chain, although it will be up to the provinces and territories to decide the way in which the product is sold.

“Canada is really the global gold standard in terms of cannabis production. So the export market is also going to be shining brightly. So I think we’re going to need several hundred producers at the end of the day of different sizes across this country to provide all the different needs that are going to come down the pipe,” explained Hyde.

“People can’t tell the difference between licensed producers anymore.”

“The world is going to explode in terms of the opportunities.”

But with all of this new growth comes concerns that the industry is becoming homogenous. On Friday, cannabis business analysts warned an audience at the Lift Cannabis Expo in Toronto about “massive investor fatigue.”

“Fundamentally, to some degree, these businesses, as prescribed by Health Canada and being in a highly regulated industry are almost forced to be identical,” Aaron Salz, CEO of Stoic Advisory, said in a speech on Friday. “People can’t tell the difference between licensed producers anymore.”

 


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Mary Jane Berlin 2017 From June 16 to 18 11:00 to 20:00 Funkhaus Berlin Nalepastr. 8th 12459 Berlin www.maryjane-berlin.de

Pack your bags and head off to Berlin

Last year, the first major hemp trade fair capital in the old post station took place, has been transformed into an idyllic place for the entire cannabis scene thanks to expert preparation. More than 100 international exhibitors, many snacks and very positive mood of pleasant reggae sound created beautiful atmosphere and let the many visitors closer to the marijuana issue, as it is common in everyday life. Since the enthusiasm also echoed many of those at home and do not want to stay away from the Berlin Hemp days on the Mary Jane Berlin in 2017, the special event expanded this year to almost double the size. The Mary Jane Berlin 2017 invites to convince even more people from the many useful properties of hemp Gewächses and bring connoisseurs of the topic of news as interesting facts about it.

For this reason, the team moved to Duc Anh Dang the consequences and saddles in 2017 in a larger area, which will provide enough space over 150 exhibitors. In the radio house Plänterwald are all well-known manufacturers of garden products, and cannabis products be represented at over 5000 m² of hall space and 2,000 m² outdoor area and present to interested visitors their latest achievements from 16 to 18 June. For a cheap day ticket of Mary Jane Berlin 2017 15 € – 30 € demanded euros for an even more favorable three-day ticket, which are wisely invested hemp friends. Rarely does one find the concentrated industry in one place concentrated even more rarely you meet the blended cream of the crop in the German capital.

Now since this country was cannabis as medicine finally accepted, is also to be expected with increased incidence of personalities from overseas. So 2017 offers the Mary Jane Berlin will naturally be a packed stage program in which more than twenty national and international specialists reveal their knowledge and are available for discussion groups available. A much larger hall is on the second held hemp trade fair for the dissemination of information to delegates whose discussions can therefore take place this year in an undisturbed setting. Among other Growing expert Mr. Jose will talk about cannabis cultivation in general, Rick Simpson strong case for a quick completion of Prohibition and Gerhard Seyfried reads from his book “Hemp in happiness.” Even the medical aspect is, of course, thoroughly lit and of course the driver’s license law is subject to a panel discussion.

Plenty of good reasons – to show the first warm rays of the Berlin city sun and to philosophize with many like-minded people about the changes in legislation, the benefits of Nutzgewächses and the failure of Prohibition – the Mary Jane Berlin 2017 therefore provides no doubt. Ways his favorite producers, editors of trade magazines, or even deserved praise speak out are on the June 16 to 18 in Berlin held hemp trade fair guarantees to satisfy given. Only the available repertoire of subjects for all undecided traders will slowly rar …

Let’s meet at:

Mary Jane Berlin 2017

From June 16 to 18

11:00 to 20:00

Funkhaus Berlin
Nalepastr. 8th
12459 Berlin

www.maryjane-berlin.de


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Dr. Franjo Grotenhermen – HERO!

Solidarity for abandoned cannabis patients.

Dr. med. Franjo Grotenhermen Employee of the nova Institute, Chairman of the Cannabis Association as Medicine (ACM)
Dr. med. Franjo Grotenhermen, photo: Archive

 

The well-known physician and chairman of the Cannabis Association as a medicine (ACM) Dr. Franjo Grotenhermen has made a moving decision. Although certain positive aspects could be felt in parts through the enacted cannabis-as-medicine law, there would be enough problems in the entire treatment area, which now led to a drastic measure. During the ACM Annual General Meeting in Frankfurt on May 12, 2017, the medical doctor, who has been advocating medical medicine for many years, declares his decision not to eat any food for the next one to two weeks as a result of solidarity with the many cannabis patients left alone.
Doctor Franjo Grotenhermen joins the hunger strike.

 


Dr. Franjo Grotenhermen at the ACM Annual General Meeting 2017 explains hunger strike.

 

The drug policy speakers of the parties were informed before Dr. Franjo Grotenhermen of the warnings – an honorary man.


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Legalize It, a Zurich-based group, has launched a campaign to legally regulate cannabis across Switzerland

Could Switzerland Become the First European Country to Legally Regulate Cannabis?

Nine years after a Swiss referendum failed to gain public approval for cannabis legalisation, a campaign group has reignited the movement for reform.

Legalize It, a Zurich-based group, has launched a campaign to legally regulate cannabis across Switzerland. The objectives of the initiative, Legalize It describes, are three-fold: to allow adults the “freedom and right to consume cannabis”, to prevent those who seek cannabis from having to purchase from the “black market”, and to ensure increased investment into drug use prevention, related research, and social security. The funds for such investment, the group says, will be acquired from the taxation of cannabis sales, and savings on law enforcement expenditure.

The campaign comes in the form of a federal popular initiative, a legislative instrument by which Swiss citizens can suggest changes in the law. If the proposal garners 100,000 valid signatures from Swiss citizens, it will be put forward for debate by the Federal Council, the country’s highest executive authority, and the Federal Assembly, the highest legislative authority.

The Federal Palace of Switzerland. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The cultivation, sale, and use of cannabis are outlawed in Switzerland in almost all cases, however punishment for minor possession is relatively light. Under the current law, an adult found to be in possession of up to 10 grams of cannabis will be fined 100 Swiss francs (£78), and will not be criminally prosecuted. In 2015, there were a total of 18,366 such fines across Switzerland.

Around three percent of adult Swiss residents use cannabis monthly, and almost 40 per cent of adults claim to have used it at least once in their life, according to Addiction Monitoring in Switzerland.

An attempt to legally regulate cannabis was resoundingly opposed by the public in a 2008 referendum, in which 63 per cent of voters opposed the measure. However, the public’s view on the subject has changed over the past decade, according to Nino Forrer, spokesperson for Legalise It.

“Many other countries have legalised or decriminalised cannabis in some form since 2008 and the results are good […] Based on this new data, the Swiss people will see more benefits than harms in legalising cannabis, I’m sure”, Forrer told TalkingDrugs.

“There has not been a massive rise in cannabis consumption among the youth [in places that have legalised cannabis], no surge in traffic accidents, no massive increased health costs. Instead, many jurisdictions have put the extra money from cannabis taxes into public healthcare, infrastructure, and schools in order to improve the standard of living for their people.”

A legal cannabis crow in Colorado. Source: Brett Levin

For example, in 2016, the US state of Colorado collected over $150 million in cannabis sale taxes, of which around $50 million was directed to school projects. Similarly, Legalize Itclaims that taxing the drug could raise 100 million Swiss francs (£78 million) each year, based on their estimates of consumption rates.

Forrer believes that the success of foreign initiatives, such as that in Colorado, may be enough for the Swiss authorities and public to support Legalize It’s new campaign – but only if the message can be effectively be delivered.

“We have had very good responses so far! Many people in Switzerland were waiting for this initiative, so they are very happy that we have started it”, Forrer told us.

“Now, we will try to inform the public as much as possible in order to gather a strong activist base all over the country. Mass media affects our perception of cannabis to a large extent, so good press is needed in order to win over the minds of Swiss people”.

If this initiative proves successful, Switzerland could become the first country in Europe to introduce a legally regulated cannabis market.

Avinash Tharoor is the Editor of TalkingDrugs. He tweets at @AvinashTharoor


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German researchers seek 25,000 marijuana users for study

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/pot-smokers-wanted-german-researchers-seek-25000-marijuana-users-study-1618629

German researchers are hoping to get government backing for a new study that would see the recruitment of 25,000 recreational marijuana smokers.

The Research Initiative on Cannabis Consumption are seeking government approval to analyse the cannabis users in order to understand the effects of the drug after several years of use.

Their application is aimed at conducting a “Scientific Study on Cannabis Sequences for Mentally Healthy Adult Consumers” they say.

Germany legalised marijuana for medicinal purposes earlier in 2017 with new powers given to doctors to prescribe the drug to seriously ill patients at their discretion.

This, researchers say, paves the way for a new study analysing the longer-term effects of the drug.

Cannabis for recreational use is still illegal, but that hasn’t stopped 2,000 people already signing up for the study, say the researchers.

The group announced plans to begin the study in November 2016 saying it wanted to analyse the mental effects on those addicted to the drug.

“In Germany several million people regularly get high on cannabis,” wrote lawyer and chief executive of the project Marko Dörre in a statement released after the plans were submitted.

“It is time that science becomes more engaged with recreational use.”

Marijuana
German researchers are hunting for 25,000 cannabis smokers for a new study.Reuters/John Vizcaino

As part of the study, those selected would be permitted to pick up 30 grams of pharmaceutical cannabis, usually reserved for medical patients, on a monthly basis.

Researchers are prohibiting anyone under 18, first-time marijuana smokers, as well as candidates with high-risk of addiction or psychiatric problems, from taking part in the study.

Before the new act on the Amendment of Narcotics Regulations passed earlier this year, only around 1,000 people with serious medical conditions were permitted to use cannabis.

“With the law implemented in March changing controlled substance regulations, the German parliament took on a new risk assessment of cannabis,” said Dörre.

“The new assessment will also benefit science.”

The BfArM declined to comment to Tagesspiegel as to whether it had in fact received the application or the chances of it being approved.