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Patient Advocate since 1977.


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Leafly Launches German-Language Edition

Leafly German

Leafly.de is a medical cannabis information resource and knowledge portal

BERLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Leafly, the world’s cannabis information resource, has arrived in Germany with the launch of www.Leafly.de, a German-language medical cannabis information resource and knowledge portal. The new German-language version of Leafly capitalizes on the expertise Leafly has cultivated over the past seven years as the world’s most visited cannabis website. As one of Leafly’s most prominent international ventures to date, Leafly.de formalizes Leafly’s commitment to providing reliable, accessible information about cannabis to people in Germany and around the world.

Leafly’s arrival in Germany was celebrated this week at a launch event in Berlin. Medical cannabis patients and representatives from the media joined Leafly’s editorial team to participate in a lively exchange on the topic of medical cannabis. Leafly’s inaugural German-language editorial team includes a range of healthcare experts, including science journalists, researchers, and a doctor. The launch of Leafly.de follows Leafly’s appearance at Berlin’s annual Hanfparade last year. Hanfparade is the largest pro-cannabis and hemp event in Germany that has taken place every year since 1997.

Leafly is the world’s leading cannabis website and mobile application, generating more than 12 million unique visits per month and more than 60 million page views. Approximately 70 percent of Leafly’s traffic comes from the United States and 30 percent originates from international destinations, including Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Spain, South Africa, and the United Kingdom. With the launch of Leafly.de, Leafly is now available in English, Spanish, French, and German.

Leafly.de initially will focus on several subject areas of immediate concern to medical cannabis patients and their healthcare providers. Visitors to the site can learn more about Germany’s recent medical cannabis reforms, how those changes affect them, and how they can become medical cannabis patients. News and analysis regarding medical cannabis laws and the supply of licensed cannabis-derived medicines will also be covered. In addition, Leafly.de will serve as a guide for doctors, pharmacists, and other medical professionals to learn more about the medical use of cannabis for conditions such as chronic pain.

Leafly.de taps into Leafly’s global coverage of cannabis science, medicine, and patient trends. Visitors will find the latest scientific research, patient surveys, and breaking news. The site also features a comprehensive cannabis dictionary featuring information from the anatomy of the cannabis plant to breaking policy news in Germany. The depth of Leafly’s expertise is why millions of people around the world visit Leafly every month for cannabis news and information.

Visit http://www.Leafly.de for more information.

About Leafly

As the world’s largest cannabis information resource, Leafly’s mission is to help patients and consumers make informed choices about cannabis and to empower cannabis businesses to attract and retain loyal customers through advertising and technology services. Learn more at http://www.leafly.com or download the five-star rated Leafly mobile app through Apple’s App Store or Google Play.

Original press release: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170512005681/en/Leafly-Launches-German-Language-Edition

 


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Why is Big Pharma fighting Medical Marijuana so hard? A new report published in Health Affairs found that if all states had legalized medical cannabis in 2014, Medicaid could have saved $1 billion in spending on prescriptions…could be one of the reasons.

If all states had had a medical marijuana law in 2014, we estimated that total savings for fee-for-service Medicaid could have been $1.01 billion. 

I write about retail and cannabis.

A new report published in Health Affairs found that if all states had legalized medical marijuana in 2014, Medicaid could have saved $1 billion in spending on prescriptions.

The study by Ashley C. Bradford and W. David Bradford examined whether states with medical marijuana laws saw changes for prescription drugs among Medicare Part D enrollees. Their analysis covered data between 2007 to 2014 and found that patients did indeed substitute medical marijuana for FDA-approved prescription drugs in these states.

“Total estimated Medicaid savings associated with these laws ranged from $260.8 million in 2007 to $475.8 million in 2014,” the study states. Granted this is only 2% of the total Medicaid drug spending for 2014, which was $23.9 billion, but it is still substantial savings. The Bradfords estimate that if all states had legalized medical marijuana in 2014, “The national savings for fee-for-service Medicaid would have been approximately $1.01 billion.” This works out to an average per state savings of $19.825 million a year.

However, only 26% of Medicaid customers are enrolled in the fee-for-service program. The study notes that if they applied their analysis equally to Medicaid managed care, then the savings could jump to a whopping $3.89 billion. Again, this is only if all states legalized medical marijuana.

Granted the savings are mostly enjoyed by private insurers that run the plans, but the Bradfords suggest that state governments could reduce their payments to the insurers as prescription drug costs fall.

The study only looked at conditions that could be treated with medical marijuana and the prescription drugs that would be affected. This included anxiety, depression, glaucoma, nausea, pain, psychosis, seizures, sleep disorders and spasticity. According to the study, “the differences ranged from a 42% reduction for prescriptions used to treat nausea to a 15% reduction for spasticity.” The Bradfords also found a 13% decline in depression drug prescriptions, a 12% drop in psychosis drug prescriptions and an 11% slide in pain drugs. There was no significant drop in drugs used for anxiety, glaucoma or sleep disorders.

The Bradfords noted that their study was challenged by the fact that states keep changing their medical marijuana laws and expanding approved conditions. Furthermore, they only had data available from fee-for-service Medicaid prescriptions. Managed care patient data was inconsistent. Thus, their findings are really lower than what the true savings could really be, suggesting it could be in the billions.