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Patient Advocate since 1977.


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Regulation in Germany….and we aren’t talking about soccer :)

The current regulation in Germany made it difficult for German companies to apply to get a license for Cannabis cultivation.

** And that is why the process is now held up in litigation in the German court system. One of the unsuccessful bidders has sued over the requirements and the entire application process is on hold, with any potential awards being made in Q1 or Q2 2018 at the earliest.

What is the most popular model for cannabis cultivation in Germany, so far?
The cultivation in Germany is currently not legal, done outdoors and indoors and hidden from sight and smell as best as possible.

There is no legal German cultivation currently allowed, even for patients with valid medical approvals.

There is small cultivation being done as part of R+D projects in Universities and Scientific companies.

Regarding joint ventures: How do foreign cannabis companies usually work together with German companies?

In various ways, based on their business objectives and strategy. Three examples are:

Canopy Growth Corporation purchased a German firm Medcann, which became Spektrum Germany. They are considered by many to be the premier cannabis firm in Germany today.

Maricann of Canada purchased a former cargo facility in Dresden for 3€ million and is ramping up their European operations, adding staff, and building out their new European headquarters.

An international firm is currently in discussions with a German startup, to establish a joint venture partnership which will make news around the world. This partnership should be made public in early 2018 and will be ground-breaking.

To cover the demand of medical cannabis Germany is importing from other countries. Supply is coming especially from Canada. Which other countries might be relevant cannabis suppliers in the future?

Canada and The Netherlands are currently the only authorized countries to import into Germany. Supplies are seriously constrained and with Canada becoming a legal recreational country in July 2018, the supply bottlenecks are expected to be exacerbated well into 2019.

Tilray has announced plans to establish a cultivation facility in Portugal to supply the German, and European market in the future.

The governments of Greece, Israel, South Africa, Australia, Chile, Uruguay, and others are currently working with private sector companies to establish their own cultivation and export capabilities.

Germany, with twice the population of California, is a key market for any serious player in the global cannabis industry.

What is your personal opinion about the current German regulation. What will be the next major steps?

Regulation and taxation is always better than the illegality and violence of the black market. Always.

Thank God for the German court system which has brought legalized medical marijuana to the people, if it were up to the politicians, we would still be waiting.

Now the intelligent implementation of recreational laws need to be established to legalize the plant which has been used for thousands of years.

Reducing opioid deaths, helping certain people with their medical conditions, and enabling super-straight people to enjoy jazz music are just some of the benefits of a world where ganja is regulated, safe, and profitable.

The flower of cannabis will always have a place in the market, but in the next years we will see an increase in other forms of cannabis that are more easily consumed….edibles, oils, salves and the like. As a result, GMP (Good Manufacturing Process) certification is going to become very important for those wanting to establish a quality product in the German and European markets.

And if we look at the European Cannabis market. Which major market trends do you identify?

1- Everyone seems to be focusing on cultivation, but this segment is expected to become a commodity item in the near term. Companies may want to look at establishing a product line including “finished products with GMP certification” to become a leading force in this market.

2- At some point the insurance companies are going to become true partners in providing cannabis therapies to the German pharmacies. This will happen as a result of cost-savings and health-benefits realized vs. the current pharmaceuticals offered to patients.

3- In the words of Peter Tosh:
“Legalize it.”

The Berlin Peace Accords (attached) calls for an end to the 80 year World War On Cannabis, and we agree. Legal, regulated, safe and non-violent recreational marijuana markets have already been established in the US and Uruguay, with Canada and others joining the party in 2018.

Pharmaceutical companies don’t like it, Beer companies don’t like it (although the owners of Corona beer just invested $250 million in Canopy Growth’s cannabis business last month) and some short-sighted politicians don’t like it. But “We the People…” have made our opinions known and the calls for a rational, legal, safe and non-violent cannabis market is just a few moments away here in the center of Europe.

These are historic times, Germany is leading the world in many ways, 2018 will be an interesting year.

peace,
Phil

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MERKEL GETS RELIGION on the 500-year anniversary of Martin Luther’s Reformation project. Legalized marijuana in Germany now on the horizon.

Cannabis Consultant in Germany

Cenedella.DE

October 31, 2017

As many Americans start the day making plans for Halloween 2017, the folks here in Germany have the day off of work to celebrate the 500-year Anniversary of Martin Luther’s project to reform German society. Surprisingly, the newspapers today also announced Chancellor Angela Merkel’s intentions, along with her new coalition partners called the “Jamaican coalition” to consider legalizing marijuana.

Seems an unintended benefit of the AFD’s victories in the last elections, is the CDU ruling party is now more receptive to working with those with divergent views in order to maintain their leadership position.

Could this really be the start of the Reformation of the 20th century drug laws in Germany and beyond?

Has the work of the DHV in Berlin and their partners finally started to pay dividends?

Was the signing of the BERLIN PEACE ACCORDS http://www.berlinpeaceaccords.de , which begins with “We the people of the Year 2017 do…
Hereby declare that it is our inalienable basic human right to have the freedom to grow, medicate and enjoy the plant we call Cannabis, without any governmental limitations.
We demand our plant has no more regulations or limitations than a tomato plant…..” really have been the precursor to this historic moment?

Good questions, time will tell, but for sure our collective efforts as cannabis business executives are starting to pay dividends.

The month of October had started off with over 350 doctors, scientists, investors and industry professionals waking up in view of the massive Cologne Cathedral, which is truly an amazing sight to see in person! The International Association for Cannabinoid Medicines’ (IACM) CANNABINOID CONFERENCE was held in downtown Cologne bringing together experts from Canada, Australia, Germany, and from throughout the world. Their website is http://www.cannabis-med.org and three take-aways were:

The idea that “Marijuana has no medicinal value” was pretty much, fully debunked 😊

The breath and quantity of existing “clinical trials” on our plant is amazing.

Meeting Josh Stanley, whose company has arguably helped more medical marijuana patients than anyone, was a privilege. CW Hemp’s team continues to lead the industry in many ways,…and additionally they are simply very cool people.

Later in the month, the folks from the regulatory and compliance organization ASTM came to Berlin for a 2-day intensive session for their new “Technical Committee D37 on Cannabis” section. You know we are becoming a real industry when 2 days is spent talking only about compliance related issues. Half the group was from Germany, including executives from the first licensed marijuana testing facility located within Germany, scientists from the University of Berlin currently working on marijuana clinical trials, and a few of the leading homegrown companies on the front lines including ABCann Germany, MH Hemp, Pedanois, and two guys who reminded me of what a young Ed Rosenthal would be like. 😊

So as November 2017 begins, many of us will meet in Berlin this weekend for the first annual DHV Convention. Their website is https://hanfverband.de and they are unequivocally the leading organization for marijuana reform in Germany today. This convention will probably confirm these four truths of the marijuana landscape in Germany today:

Canadian firms are kicking butt!
They understand the requirement of GMP certification, their government is supportive of providing qualified companies an export license for their THC-based products, and their executives are damn smart.

German firms are coming of age, are intelligent and committed.
The first DHV convention will be highlighting the work of patient advocates, industry professionals, knowledgeable physicians and forward-looking politicians involved in building this new industry within the German borders.

The European, South American, African, Israeli and Australian firms are all actively making plans to succeed.
Governments, investors, and executives from throughout the world are looking at Germany and making their plans to enter the European market with its 750+ million potential customers. They are forming strategic partnerships, investing in commercial facilities, and making Europe a priority for 2018.

The USA is an abysmal no-show in the game.
America started the war on Marihuana last century, and somehow tries to keep the war alive today. Scientist, Stoners and Society have evolved quite a bit since the 1930s. The Germans have taken note, changed course in their direction, and their people will be better off as a result.

Maybe now it’s time for President Trump get religion and start his own Marijuana Reformation project?

– Philip J. Cenedella


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The Situation With Medicinal Cannabis In Europe – A Complete Overview MEDICINAL CANNABIS

https://sensiseeds.com/en/blog/situation-medicinal-cannabis-europe-complete-overview/

Sativex and Bedrocan are now available in many European countries, and several have infrastructure in place to supply patients with medicinal cannabis. So which countries are moving with the times, and which are dragging their heels? Where are medicinal and recreational users most (and least) free to utilize their drug of choice? Let’s take a look at the facts.

While there is plenty of accurate, up-to-date information online about medicinal cannabis in Europe, finding one reliable source to tell you everything you need to know can be an all-but-impossible task. So we’ve collated hundreds of online resources – news reports, analysis by governments and NGOs, and patient perspectives – in order to create a complete overview of the status of medicinal cannabis in Europe.

We have striven for clarity and accuracy in all respects, but we recognise the fact that legislative waters can at times be murky and misinterpretations can be made. Added to this, legislation is changing rapidly, so we’ll be adding updates every three months or more if necessary. Thus, we welcome any comments, feedback, or corrections – and your input will help us to make this a truly interactive resource that will continue to be relevant for many years to come!

Medicinal Cannabis Legality & Availability In Europe

The Situation With Medicinal Cannabis In Europe – A Complete Overview

This map shows the general state of medicinal cannabis legality and availability in Europe. All countries that have passed medicinal cannabis laws, that have approved whole-plant cannabis or cannabis-based drugs, or that make cannabis/cannabis-based drugs available in some form are marked green.

At first glance, the situation looks relatively good in the majority of European nations. However, we need a little more analysis to really get a clear picture, as medicinal cannabis laws and praxis vary wildly between countries.

Some countries that have passed laws supposedly allowing for the provision of medicinal cannabis do not actually permit anyone to use it; other countries do prescribe certain cannabis derivatives or synthetic cannabinoids, but do not allow whole-plant cannabis, while others have relatively relaxed laws that allow for personal medicinal cultivation, cannabis social clubs that supply medicinal users, and a range of different prescription medications.

Some of the countries marked in green don’t actually have medicinal cannabis laws at all, and haven’t approved any existing cannabis-based drugs, but still make medicinal cannabis or cannabis-based drugs available to certain patients under special access rules. In these countries, the national health authorities usually import the drugs on a strictly-limited, case-by-case basis. Obviously they are not ideal systems, but if laws have been passed or if there are patients receiving cannabis drugs or derivatives in those countries, then they get included in the green section of the map.

If you wish to know more about the cannabis-based drugs that are available in Europe today, please take a look at our post Cannabinoids in medicine – an overview for doctors and professionals, published in March 2016.

Sativex Availability In Europe

The Situation With Medicinal Cannabis In Europe – A Complete Overview

First, let’s take a look at Sativex availability. Although controversial, Sativex has won considerable success in gaining approval in much of Europe and in many other countries worldwide. The reasons for controversy surrounding Sativex are manifold.

Many activists and patients believe that licensing and regulating Sativex while cannabis itself remains illegal (as is now the case in the majority of Europe) is unfair and discriminatory, particularly given that it is a whole-plant extract and thus is essentially cannabis (unlike synthetic, single-molecule drugs like nabilone and dronabinol, which we will discuss later).

These issues are further compounded by the fact that Sativex is prohibitively expensive and inconsistently available in many countries. In the UK, Sativex is only available on the NHS in Wales. In August 2014, the All Wales Medicines Strategy Group (AWMSG) recommended that Sativex could be prescribed on the NHS (meaning that costs would be borne by the health authorities with just a small nominal charge to the patient) in Wales for treating MS-related spasticity.

However, the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) did not recommend prescription of Sativex in England in their 2014 MS Clinical Guideline “because it is not a cost effective treatment”.

In April 2011, the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC – the Scottish equivalent to NICE) also announced that it was unable to recommend Sativex, as it had not received a marketing authorisation submission from GW Pharmaceuticals. Thus, patients in England and Scotland wishing to obtain Sativex must “go private” and cover all costs themselves.

A similar pricing issue exists in France, where authorities approved Sativex back in 2013, but have yet to agree a sale price with GW Pharmaceuticals’ European distributor, Almirall. Sensi Seeds reported in December 2015 that Sativex was still not available in France, and that there was little likelihood that it would be available in the near future.

In Finland, Denmark and Norway, Sativex is available on a strictly-limited, case-by-case basis, and is prohibitively expensive compared to other forms of medicinal cannabis. However, the situation in Finland has improved significantly over the last few years (since medicinal cannabis laws were passed in 2008); the number of patients receiving medical cannabis in the form of Sativex or Bedrocan products rose from just 12 in 2010 to around 200 in 2014.

In Ireland and Malta, Sativex has technically been approved but never prescribed – in Ireland, pricing issues have delayed the release of Sativex, while in Malta, the sole application received thus far was recently rejected by the health authorities.

GW Pharmaceuticals’ near-monopoly on legal medicinal cannabis allows it to profit significantly, while individuals growing personal quantities of cannabis continue to be criminalised throughout much of Europe. Many individuals that grow cannabis in small quantities intended for personal medicinal use do so as it presents the only truly affordable option. That these individuals continue to be persecuted for reasons that appear to be solely economic is a dire failure on the part of the national and supranational authorities of Europe.

Marinol/Cesamet Availability In Europe

The Situation With Medicinal Cannabis In Europe – A Complete Overview

Nabilone and dronabinol, marketed as Marinol and Cesamet (or Canemes in some countries), are two single-molecule, synthetic THC analogues that have also gained approval in many European countries. Generally, they are approved for nausea, vomiting and weight loss related to cancer and HIV.

As synthetic, single-molecule drugs, nabilone and dronabinol are of limited effectiveness, and are also associated with more severe side-effects than cannabis itself. Several countries have allowed use of nabilone and dronabinol while continuing to prohibit use of medicinal cannabis itself, such as Denmark, which has approved thousands of applications for Marinol in the last decade but none for Bedrocan.

Dronabinol and nabilone were developed over 30 years ago, and have never been particularly popular with either patients or healthcare professionals. Although they have been prescribed to many more patients than Sativex at this stage, there are clear signs that Sativex is now taking over in terms of availability, acceptability and popularity. This surely represents a step in the right direction, towards recognition of the superior medicinal value of whole-plant cannabis over single-molecule, synthetic therapies.

In Germany, nabilone and dronabinol are both apparently still available on prescription, but since 1991, they have not been available on the open market as finished medicinal products (i.e. they are not pre-packaged and available for purchase from pharmacies).

Interestingly, dronabinol is scheduled under international law, as it is a stereoisomer of THC, whereas nabilone is not scheduled as its molecular structure differs from true cannabinoids substantially. In Iceland, for example, dronabinol is technically banned, but has been exempted and authorized for use in special cases by the Icelandic Medicines Agency. Nabilone is not subject to a ban – but each drug has only been prescribed in a tiny number of cases, under special access rules.

Bedrocan Availability In Europe

The Situation With Medicinal Cannabis In Europe – A Complete Overview

Countries that permit the use of Bedrocan (or other products from the same manufacturer, i.e. Bediol, Bedrobinol and so on) are much more limited, and in most cases, the medicine can only be imported on a case-by-case basis by the national health authority of the country in question.

As Bedrocan products are whole-plant, herbal cannabis flowers, countries that allow its use would seem to be the more progressive of the European countries with regards to cannabis use. In reality, the situation is a little more complex.

Bedrocan products are considered preferable to Sativex for various reasons, but dissatisfaction among patients remains. In Norway and Finland, for example, Bedrocan products may only be imported on a strict case-by-case basis with approval from the national health authority. They represent a comparatively inexpensive option – in Finland, Sativex reportedly costs €650 for three spray bottles containing 810mg THC and 750mg CBD in total; equivalent total cannabinoids can be obtained from Bedrocan products costing €200 or less.

However, very few individuals actually have access to Bedrocan (in Finland: 123 in 2012, though numbers are likely to have risen since then), and the number of conditions for which it can be prescribed is greatly limited.

Bedrocan in the Netherlands
In the Netherlands, Bedrocan became the sole licensed medicinal cannabis producer in 2003, with the implementation of the 2001 law purportedly legalizing cannabis for medicinal use – which also saw the creation of the Dutch Office of Medicinal Cannabis (OMC).

But prior to this, medicinal cannabis (reportedly cheaper and more effective) was available from at least one other supplier (Maripharm BV, a company that is now restricted to making CBD-only products) and utilized by thousands more patients, who were prescribed cannabis by their doctors and obtained their medicine directly from over 1,000 different pharmacies. This situation wasn’t legal, but it was tolerated, and it appears to have been greatly preferable for patients.

In 2001, the OMC was established (according to UN treaty rules, a country must establish an office to oversee medicinal cannabis if it wishes to make it available), and in 2003, the new medicinal policy was implemented. But it may have had the effect of making medicinal cannabis less available to Dutch patients – according to the BSEMC (the Public Interest Foundation for Effective Medical Cannabis), 10,000–15,000 patients used medicinal cannabis each year under the old system compared to just 140 each year between 2003 and 2013.

A study from the University of Utrecht published in 2013 puts the figure considerably higher, at approximately 1,000 per year; we are currently awaiting figures from the OMC itself, and will update as soon as the information becomes available.

Patient concerns regarding Bedrocan products are not limited to availability or cost, however – all Bedrocan products are treated with gamma radiation to ensure pesticides, heavy metals and microorganisms are purged out. This is a requirement of the OMC, but has caused concerns over effectiveness and safety in some patients, and led many to purchase cannabis from coffeeshops in preference to pharmacy products. This video report from the Cannabis News Network goes into great detail on the subject of Bedrocan and medicinal cannabis legislation in the Netherlands.

Furthermore, as Sensi Seeds reported earlier this year, Bedrocan is struggling to provide other European countries with sufficient product. As the sole supplier of medicinal cannabis in Europe, demand for their services is rising rapidly, to the extent that a new production facility was opened in 2015 – but supply bottlenecks continue to occur.

European National Programs For Medicinal Cannabis Cultivation

In a small number of European countries, the national government has taken the stance that state control and regulation of the medicinal cannabis market is the sensible route forward. Ostensibly, these state-run programs have the advantage of offering cannabis to registered patients at a lower rate than currently-available forms.

Presently, the only European nations implementing state-controlled medicinal cannabis production are Italy, the Netherlands, and the Czech Republic. As already discussed, the Netherlands has awarded the sole license to produce medicinal cannabis to Bedrocan BV. Germany is now discussing plans to implement a similar program, but it is not thought that this will be in effect until at least 2017.

Here, we do not class the UK among countries producing medicinal cannabis, despite GW Pharmaceuticals’ license to grow cannabis and manufacture Sativex, as Sativex is not distributed as whole-plant, herbal cannabis flowers (and is not widely available in the UK).

In the Czech Republic, the logistics company Elkoplast is licensed to produce medicinal cannabis using Bedrocan strains and expertise. According to reports, Elkoplast distributed its first crop of 11 kg in February 2016; the cost of the Elkoplast cannabis is apparently around 100 Koruna (€3.70) per gram (compared to around 300 Koruna/€11 for imported Bedrocan). Elkoplast intends to produce 40 kg this year.

Last year, doctors registered to prescribe medicinal cannabis in the Czech republic (who currently number around 20) supplied cannabis to just 30 patients. It is thought that patients numbers will increase significantly with the implementation of the new system. Medicinal cannabis only became legal in the Czech Republic in 2013, so progress has been comparatively rapid to date.

In Italy, the army recently completed its first crop of cannabis intended for distribution to patients with a doctor’s prescription for medicinal cannabis. The Army plans to grow 100 kg this year – which is reportedly around double the quantity currently imported from the Netherlands, and regional health authorities aim to distribute it for €5–€15 per gram, compared to approximately €40 per gram for Bedrocan.

Interestingly, any doctor in Italy may prescribe medicinal cannabis to a patient – this situation differs dramatically from many other European nations, where cannabis may only be prescribed by specialists such as neurologists and oncologists. Furthermore, numbers of doctors willing to prescribe cannabis appears to be relatively high, and patient interest is rapidly growing.

On the other hand, this latter fact is known partially through the reported high volume of applications to import Bedrocan products made by Italian patients to the Dutch OMC. The Army crop is yet to be distributed, and the process has been subject to several delays thus far. However, Italy is demonstrating a very progressive attitude despite remaining mired in logistical difficulties, and the extent of progress here is highly encouraging.

State Control Of Cannabis May Not Be Ideal
Typically, the element of state control involved in such programs is simply licensing out the right to grow medicinal cannabis to a single producer. This is far from ideal, for various reasons: supply issues such as those experienced by Bedrocan and a lack of competition on price, quality and variety are commonly cited potential problems.

In Italy, state control of the production of cannabis does not exist alongside the right to cultivate personal quantities of cannabis, as is the case in the Netherlands and the Czech Republic. It was widely reported in January 2016 that cultivation of medical cannabis had been decriminalised in Italy, but it does not appear that this is entirely accurate.

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi in January announced a long list of minor reforms, including the lifting of criminal penalties for violations of medical cannabis cultivation rules. However, it appears that this only applies to researchers or individuals “working in the field of medicinal cannabis”, and not to the general public.

Thus, the Italian system has been criticized as just another half-measure, which monopolizes potential profits and deprives patients of choice and anonymity. There are also doubts over whether the amount of cannabis produced by the army will be sufficient to meet patient needs, and as Italy operates on a regional healthcare system, some are concerned that the cost of state-produced cannabis will vary widely between locales. Reportedly, the crop will also be gamma-irradiated, which may raise similar concerns as in the Netherlands.

However, the next few years will continue to see decisive change in Italy. Currently, the Italian Parliament is holding talks on the possibility of implementing further steps towards both medicinal and recreational legalization of cannabis. Talks are still ongoing, and we will update this resource when the results of the discussions become clear.

The Situation With Medicinal Cannabis In Europe – A Complete Overview

Personal Cultivation Laws In Europe

The decriminalisation of personal cultivation is a very useful metric for establishing the level of tolerance a country holds towards the concept of medicinal cannabis.

Cultivation of cannabis by the general public is illegal in all European countries. However, a handful of nations have decriminalised or depenalised personal cultivation or personal cultivation for medicinal purposes; several other countries have taken steps towards decriminalisation or are in the process of implementing recently-passed laws, and several more have established precedents whereby medicinal growers have avoided criminal charges despite national laws.

Another thing to consider is the fact that many European countries have a disconnect between legislation and practice when it comes to personal possession and cultivation. Many countries operate unofficial tolerance policies that are at odds with their actual legislation; this is extremely difficult to assess due to the fact that these policies are unofficial, meaning that records may not be kept, and also that policies may change at any time without necessarily being backed up by legislation.

Thus, it’s very hard to be 100% accurate on the places where you can easily get away with growing a few plants, and we’ve done our best to clarify the picture with the information that we have available.

Spain, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic and Belgium are undoubtedly the most tolerant of cannabis cultivation by the public, and generally have legislation in place that confirms or protects the right of the individual to grow a certain number of plants (in the Netherlands and the Czech Republic, up to 5 plants, and in Belgium just one plant).

In Spain, there is no legislation that specifies that cannabis cultivation is permitted, but laws that attest to the right to possess and consume any drug in private, and a substantial set of legal precedents that have mounted up over the last 20 years or so. In 1993, the precursor to what would become cannabis social clubs sprang into existence, using the existing laws on drug possession to argue that collective, private cannabis-growing associations should also therefore be legal. After many years of challenging and disrupting the project, authorities eventually ceased their persecution and allowed the operation to proceed unhindered, opening the door to hundreds more clubs.

The UK is also an interesting case. Home-growing of cannabis is very widespread in the UK, and thousands of individuals grow for medicinal purposes. There have been several examples of individuals being treated very lightly or even escaping cultivation charges altogether after demonstrating medical need, while countless others continue to be criminalized across the country.

This discrepancy partly exists due to the uneven prioritisation of cannabis between different regional police forces – indeed, several UK police forces have reportedly implemented unofficial tolerance policies for cannabis growers due to the undoubted need to free up resources to tackle more serious crimes.

Switzerland has had a somewhat patchy record on cultivation rights – due to a legal loophole, Swiss citizens were from 1995-1999 allowed to cultivate “hemp” with no specified maximum THC limit, and even after the law was amended, shops continued to sell cannabis until at least 2005. Now, the law does not support personal cultivation, but reports of personal growers being prosecuted are extremely rare.

Several other countries have made some steps towards decriminalisation, such as removing jail sentences and imposing fines or administrative charges – such as the island nation of Malta, which recently passed laws decriminalising the cultivation of personal quantities of cannabis. However, it is not clear how these new laws will be implemented in reality.

Lastly, Sweden, Germany, and Bulgaria have all established precedents whereby medicinal growers have escaped prosecution.

Cannabis Social Clubs In Europe

The small number of European states that have decriminalised personal cultivation and also permit cannabis social clubs are arguably the most tolerant of all, although no country is without its problems. For the most part, social clubs have sprung up in countries that already had a strong subculture of cannabis use, and serve as a means of ensuring quality, safety and consistency relative to the black market.

It is important to note that cannabis social clubs are not an arbitrary concept by any means. In order to be recognized by ENCOD (the European Coalition for Just and Effective Drug Policies, which has played a fundamental role in the creation of social clubs throughout Europe), would-be CSCs must meet various requirements.

The club must be a legally registered association, and therefore accountable to local and national authorities. Furthermore, the ENCOD code of conduct for CSCs sets out five basic principles:

The club only produces cannabis for the personal consumption of its members.
The club is health oriented: in production & elaboration the norms of organic agriculture are adhered too.
The purpose of the club is not to make profit, but to support activism that seeks to bring to an end to cannabis prohibition.
The club is transparent to its members and open to dialogue with authorities.
Furthermore, the club has agreed to accept the mediation of Encod should a conflict arise with one of its members or with another CSC.
If a CSC does not meet these requirements, ENCOD will not recognize the club as a legal, official entity. Despite this, there are many CSCs currently operating (particularly in Spain) without official recognition from ENCOD.

In Spain, the original birthplace of the cannabis social clubs, the situation is complex. The system is generally working well, and cannabis is widely and cheaply available, but the country is not without its problems.

Although clubs are meant to be run on a non-profit basis, the potential to make substantial quantities of money has attracted many would-be entrepreneurs that do not necessarily prioritise patient well-being. Furthermore, contraventions of health and safety regulations and similar petty violations have presented authorities in Barcelona and elsewhere with the opportunity to close down hundreds of venues.

ENCOD currently recognises CSCs in just four countries: two in Belgium, seven in Spain, one in the Netherlands, and one in Slovenia. The Slovenia Cannabis Social Club is officially registered with the local authorities, and interviews suggest that they may be supplying their medical patients with cannabis – but Slovenian law does not yet support medicinal cultivation of cannabis by the public, despite a 2014 law allowing for the supply of medicinal cannabinoids.

Other countries are hard at work setting up the foundations of what will become official CSCs as soon as legislation allows it. These countries include the UK, Austria, France and Germany.

UKCSC.co.uk supplies a long list of “official” UK cannabis social clubs, some of which apparently do supply their members with cannabis – but it is important to note that, as the UK laws do not yet support personal cultivation, these clubs are not offically recognized by ENCOD. However, it is an important and rapidly growing network, which provides much-needed support and information to its members, as well as to the media, the government, and the interested public.

So Which Countries Are Most & Least Tolerant?

The Situation With Medicinal Cannabis In Europe – A Complete Overview

As we see, when we account for all the different variables, many of the countries that supposedly make medicinal cannabis available do not in fact do so, and in fact are no more advanced in practice than the countries that have thus far refused to consider the concept at all.

So we’ve rated all the countries in Europe on a scale of most to least tolerant, with 0 as the least tolerant and 24 as the most.

Unsurprisingly, the countries that are clearly the most favourable for medicinal cannabis in Europe are the Netherlands, Spain and the Czech Republic. The Czech Republic is perhaps the most striking in the alacrity with which it has diverged from its Soviet legacy and embraced modern, progressive drug policies which put it at the forefront of Europe.

These three powerhouses are closely followed by Germany and Italy, which are rapidly making progress, and Belgium, which has an inconsistent attitude to cannabis but many patients that are currently able to access or grow their own medicine.

Which Countries Are Most Hostile To Medicinal Cannabis?

Next we have countries that are making some progress, but have not yet made medicinal cannabis available beyond a small number of limited cases, or remain generally hostile to the necessary legislative changes. Such countries include France, Ireland, Iceland, Portugal, the Baltic states, and all of the Scandinavian nations.

Russia persists in its draconian drug policies, despite some recent, erroneous reports to the contrary. Medicalmarijuana.eu and MERCY state that Russia has decriminalised the cultivation of up to 20 plants for personal use, but upon closer investigation it appears that this is not the case: any amount of cultivation may lead to criminal charges, but 20 plants or more is considered a “large amount”.

Greece is arguably one of the most hostile countries in today’s Europe, as it aggressively criminalizes growers of all types, and does not recognise the concept of medicinal cannabis at all. Indeed, but for a few exceptions, the Balkan region remains locked in deeply regressive drugs policies.

Portugal remains surprisingly hostile to medicinal cannabis, despite its famous decision in 2001 to decriminalise personal quantities of all drugs. France too has persisted in hostile and regressive attitudes towards cannabis for years, and medicinal cannabis is very difficult to access.

The microstates San Marino, Monaco, Andorra, Luxembourg and Liechtenstein have made very little movement towards legalizing medicinal cannabis. For residents of Andorra, at least, medicinal cannabis may be easily accessed just a short distance away in Catalunya.

And Which Countries Are A Good Future Bet?

Countries that have made substantial progress, but still need a lot of work put in before medicinal cannabis becomes widely available include Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia. Poland is another, but recent reports suggest that the situation is set to improve considerably in the near future.

Malta, which has only just legalized medicinal cannabis in any form, is a surprising candidate. The small island nation has a thriving subculture of cannabis use; personal cultivation has just been decriminalised, and several forms of medicinal cannabis have been made nominally available (although a recent report tells us that they have thus far rejected their sole application (for Sativex) as it was not prescribed by a “specialist”).

Also worth noting here are Eastern European several countries that have only recently begun to diverge from the hardline Soviet attitude towards drugs that still persists throughout the region. Several of these countries – such as Slovenia, Macedonia, Croatia and Serbia – are exhibiting increasingly tolerant attitudes towards cannabis, and as such we may see considerable progress in this area in the near future. Croatia and Macedonia have both made headlines this year for implementing medicinal cannabis laws; Serbia and Slovenia have also recently legalized cannabis-based derivatives, although activists have criticised this as a placatory half-measure.

Finally, the UK has a strong base of activists and growers, but has experienced a string of governments that remain surprisingly hostile to cannabis. However, the strong grower/activist base coupled with the comprehensive network of regional cannabis social clubs that are taking shape indicate that change is imminent. On the other hand, uncertainty surrounding the Brexit vote may well see the question of cannabis legalisation pushed to the back of the queue, as it has been so many times in the past.

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In Serbia the law says minimum 3 years in jail for basically possession of cannabis, smoking in public or similar. I wouldn’t consider that green in any map. Thanks!

12/08/2016


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“The unjust prohibition of marijuana has done more damage to public health than has marijuana itself.” – former U.S. Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders

In a new article appearing in next month’s American Journal of Public Health, a number of leading doctors and health experts, including former U.S. Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders, are calling for the total legalization of cannabis.

“The war on marijuana exacerbates poverty, which is strongly correlated with— among other problems—reduced access to health care,” Elders writes. “The unjust prohibition of marijuana has done more damage to public health than has marijuana itself.”

According to Marijuana Moment, Elders has advocated for drug reform since serving as Surgeon General under the Clinton administration. In 1993, she said that she believed that the country would “markedly reduce our crime rate if drugs were legalized.” Twenty-four years later, Elders notes that “times are changing. In 2017, even physicians who oppose legalization generally believe that marijuana should be decriminalized, reducing penalties for users while keeping the drug illegal.”

Elders, along with co-authors Dr. David L. Nathan and former director of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration H. Westley Clark, used their space in the Journal of Public Health to make clear their belief that decriminalization alone is not an effective solution to the problems caused by cannabis prohibition. “Although decriminalization is certainly a step in the right direction, [it is] an inadequate substitute for legalization and regulation for a number of reasons,” they wrote.

“Decriminalization does not empower the government to regulate product labeling and purity, which leaves marijuana vulnerable to contamination and adulteration,” the doctors explain. “This also renders consumers unable to judge the potency of marijuana, which is like drinking alcohol without knowing its strength. Moreover, where marijuana is merely decriminalized, the point of sale remains in the hands of drug dealers, who will sell marijuana— as well as more dangerous drugs—to children.”

“Contrary to popular belief, decriminalization does not actually end the arrests of marijuana users,” the article continues. “Despite New York State decriminalizing marijuana in the 1970s, New York City makes tens of thousands of marijuana possession arrests every year, with continuing racial disparities in enforcement.”

The doctors also describe how the prosecution of illegal cannabis growers and sellers constricts the supply chain, increasing the price of illegal cannabis as well as “making the untaxed illegal product more lucrative, the market for it more competitive and violent, and purchasing it more dangerous.”

While legalization is spreading up and down the coasts, decriminalization is still the highest point of marijuana reform for municipalities in states with strong anti-cannabis leadership.

Elders was ousted from her position as Surgeon General in 1994 because of her progressive ideas about drugs and sex, and now, with cannabis closer to the mainstream than ever before and sex-positive attitudes prevalent across American culture, hopefully, 23 years later, the country’s decision makers will finally realize that she’s been right all along.

Published on October 14, 2017
Chris Moore is a New York-based writer who has written for Mass Appeal while also mixing records and producing electronic music.
https://merryjane.com/news/former-surgeon-general-joycelyn-elders-legalization-support


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Physician Guide to Cannabis-Assisted Opioid Reduction Prepared by Adrianne Wilson-Poe, Ph.D. Distributed by Congressman Earl Blumenauer

Physician Guide to Cannabis-Assisted Opioid Reduction
Prepared by Adrianne Wilson-Poe, Ph.D.
Distributed by Congressman Earl Blumenauer
Cannabis reduces opioid overdose mortality.
• In states with medicinal cannabis laws, opioid overdoses drop by an average of 25%. This effect gets
bigger the longer the law has been in place. For instance, there is a 33% drop in mortality in California,
where compassionate use has been in place since 1996 (1).
• This finding was replicated by Columbia’s school of public health, using a completely different analysis
strategy (2).
Cannabis reduces opioid consumption.
• Cannabis is opioid-sparing in chronic pain patients. When patients are given access to cannabis, they
drop their opioid use by roughly 50%. This finding has been replicated several times from Ann Arbor to
Jerusalem (3, 4).
• This opioid sparing effect is accompanied by an enhancement of cognitive function once patients begin
cannabis therapy: this effect is most likely due to the fact that patients reduce their opioid use (5).
• Cannabis use is associated with a reduction in not only opioid consumption, but also many other drugs
including benzodiazepines, which also have a high incidence of fatal overdose. In states with medicinal
cannabis laws, the number of prescriptions for analgesic and anxiolytic drugs (among others) are
substantially reduced (6). Medicare and Medicaid prescription costs are substantially lower in states
with cannabis laws (7).
Cannabis can prevent dose escalation and the development of opioid tolerance.
• Cannabinoids and opioids have acute analgesic synergy. When opioids and cannabinoids are
coadministered, they produce greater than additive analgesia (8). This suggests that analgesic dose of
opioids is substantially lower for patients using cannabis therapy.
• In chronic pain patients on opioid therapy, cannabis does not affect pharmacokinetics of opioids, yet it
still enhances analgesia. This finding further supports a synergistic mechanism of action (9).
• Pre-clinical models indicate that cannabinoids attenuate the development of opioid tolerance (10, 11).
Cannabis, alone or in combination with opioids, could be a viable first-line analgesic.
• The CDC has updated its recommendations in the spring of 2016, stating that most cases of chronicpain
should be treated with non-opioids (12).
• The National Academies of Science and Medicine recently conducted an exhaustive review of 10,000+
human studies published since 1999, definitively concluding that cannabis itself (not a specific
cannabinoid or cannabis-derived molecule) is safe and effective for the treatment of chronic pain (13).
• When 3,000 chronic pain patients were surveyed, they overwhelmingly preferred cannabis as an opioid
alternative (14).
o 97% “strongly agreed/agreed” that they could decrease their opioid use when using cannabis
o 92% “strongly agreed/agreed” that they prefer cannabis to treat their medical condition
o 81% “strongly agreed/ agreed that cannabis by itself was more effective than taking opioids
Cannabis may be a viable tool in medication-assisted relapse prevention
• CBD is non-intoxicating, and is the 2nd most abundant cannabinoid found in cannabis. CBD alleviates
the anxiety that leads to drug craving. In human pilot studies, CBD administration is sufficient to
prevent heroin craving for at least 7 days (15).
• Cannabis users are more likely to adhere to naltrexone maintenance for opioid dependence (16).
Bibliography and References Cited
1. Bachhuber MA, Saloner B, Cunningham CO, Barry CL. Medical cannabis laws and opioid analgesic overdose
mortality in the United States, 1999-2010. JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(10):1668-73. doi:
10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.4005. PubMed PMID: 25154332; PMCID: 4392651.
2. Kim JH, Santaella-Tenorio J, Mauro C, Wrobel J, Cerda M, Keyes KM, Hasin D, Martins SS, Li G. State Medical
Marijuana Laws and the Prevalence of Opioids Detected Among Fatally Injured Drivers. Am J Public Health.
2016;106(11):2032-7. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2016.303426. PubMed PMID: 27631755; PMCID: PMC5055785.
3. Boehnke KF, Litinas E, Clauw DJ. Medical Cannabis Use Is Associated With Decreased Opiate Medication Use in a
Retrospective Cross-Sectional Survey of Patients With Chronic Pain. J Pain. 2016;17(6):739-44. doi:
10.1016/j.jpain.2016.03.002. PubMed PMID: 27001005.
4. Haroutounian S, Ratz Y, Ginosar Y, Furmanov K, Saifi F, Meidan R, Davidson E. The Effect of Medicinal Cannabis
on Pain and Quality-of-Life Outcomes in Chronic Pain: A Prospective Open-label Study. Clin J Pain.
2016;32(12):1036-43. doi: 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000364. PubMed PMID: 26889611.
5. Gruber SA, Sagar KA, Dahlgren MK, Racine MT, Smith RT, Lukas SE. Splendor in the Grass? A Pilot Study
Assessing the Impact of Medical Marijuana on Executive Function. Front Pharmacol. 2016;7:355.
doi:10.3389/fphar.2016.00355. PubMed PMID: 27790138; PMCID: PMC5062916.
6. Bradford AC, Bradford WD. Medical Marijuana Laws Reduce Prescription Medication Use In Medicare Part D. Health
Aff (Millwood). 2016;35(7):1230-6. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2015.1661. PubMed PMID: 27385238.
7. Bradford AC, Bradford WD. Medical Marijuana Laws May Be Associated With A Decline In The Number Of
Prescriptions For Medicaid Enrollees. Health Aff (Millwood). 2017;36(5):945-51. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2016.1135.
PubMed PMID: 28424215.
8. Roberts JD, Gennings C, Shih M. Synergistic affective analgesic interaction between delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and
morphine. European journal of pharmacology. 2006;530(1-2):54-8. Epub 2005/12/27. doi:
10.1016/j.ejphar.2005.11.036. PubMed PMID: 16375890.
9. Abrams DI, Couey P, Shade SB, Kelly ME, Benowitz NL. Cannabinoid-opioid interaction in chronic pain. Clinical
pharmacology and therapeutics. 2011;90(6):844-51. Epub 2011/11/04. doi: 10.1038/clpt.2011.188. PubMed PMID:
22048225.
10. Wilson AR, Maher L, Morgan MM. Repeated cannabinoid injections into the rat periaqueductal gray enhance
subsequent morphine antinociception. Neuropharmacology. 2008;55(7):1219-25. doi:
10.1016/j.neuropharm.2008.07.038. PubMed PMID: 18723035; PMCID: 2743428.
11. Smith PA, Selley DE, Sim-Selley LJ, Welch SP. Low dose combination of morphine and delta9- tetrahydrocannabinol
circumvents antinociceptive tolerance and apparent desensitization of receptors. European journal of pharmacology.
2007;571(2-3):129-37. Epub 2007/07/03. doi: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2007.06.001. PubMed PMID: 17603035; PMCID:
2040345.
12. Dowell D, Haegerich TM, Chou R. CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain – United States, 2016.
MMWR Recomm Rep. 2016;65(1):1-49. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.rr6501e1. PubMed PMID: 26987082.
13. NASEM. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for
Research. Washington (DC) 2017.
14. Reiman A, Welty M, Solomon P. Cannabis as a Substitute for Opioid-Based Pain Medication: Patient Self Report.
Cannabis Cannabinoid Res. 2017;2(1):160-6. doi: 10.1089/can.2017.0012. PubMed PMID: 28861516; PMCID:
PMC5569620.
15. Hurd YL, Yoon M, Manini AF, Hernandez S, Olmedo R, Ostman M, Jutras-Aswad D. Early Phase in the Development
of Cannabidiol as a Treatment for Addiction: Opioid Relapse Takes Initial Center Stage. Neurotherapeutics.
2015;12(4):807-15. doi: 10.1007/s13311-015-0373-7. PubMed PMID: 26269227; PMCID: PMC4604178.
16. Raby WN, Carpenter KM, Rothenberg J, Brooks AC, Jiang H, Sullivan M, Bisaga A, Comer S, Nunes EV. Intermittent
marijuana use is associated with improved retention in naltrexone treatment for opiate-dependence. Am J Addict.
2009;18(4):301-8. doi: 10.1080/10550490902927785. PubMed PMID: 19444734; PMCID: PMC2753886.


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Germany Indications for Medical Marijuana patients – from Cannabis as Medicine group

The government has, at the request of the LEFT in the Bundestag, published the diagnoses of people with an exemption for the purchase of cannabis flowers from the pharmacy. After the system exception approval is now past, these figures are likely to be the “final result” for 10 years of “exceptional medicine” cannabis via §3 paragraph 2 BtMG.

In print 18/11701 of 27.03.2017 the government writes:

The medical conditions underlying the exemptions pursuant to § 3 paragraph 2 BtMG are varied according to the information in the application documents. Some patients perform self-therapy with cannabis because of multiple diagnoses.
The main diagnosis groups and the corresponding percentages of the patients are presently as follows (duplications are
possible):

indication Percentage share
pain approximately 57 percent
ADHD approximately 14 percent
Spasticity (different genesis) approximately 10 percent
depression approximately 7 percent
Anorexia / cachexia approximately 5 percent
Tourette syndrome about 4 percent
bowel disease about 3 percent
epilepsy about 2 percent
Other psychiatry about 2 percent
Posted in Cannabis as a medicine .


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Peter Homberg is Partner and Head of the German Life Sciences Practice at Dentons, one of the top 10 global law firms present in more than 50 countries. He and his colleagues advise on Germany’s new regulations regarding the legalization of cannabis for medical use.

There are many unusual questions to be asked, so this time we caught up with a very different kind of expert: Peter Homberg is Partner and Head of the German Life Sciences Practice at Dentons, one of the top 10 global law firms present in more than 50 countries. He and his colleagues advise on Germany’s new regulations regarding the legalization of cannabis for medical use.

Peter, the effect and use of cannabis are highly controversial. What is the significance of cannabis for medical purposes and what does the legalization mean for patients?

Before the law was liberalized, patients who suffered from certain diseases, like multiple sclerosis, cancer or chronic pain, could only use cannabis if they had applied for a specific exemption at the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM). As regulations were extremely strict, only a few hundred patients were granted the permission to use the cannabis plant for medicinal purposes.

So what does it do? The plant is famous for containing THC, short for tetrahydrocannabinol, which binds to specific cannabis receptors (CB) in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The activation of CB1 in the spinal cord, for instance, reduces the perception of pain. In terms of medical use this means that cannabis can give relief to people suffering from cancer, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain and other serious diseases

The change in law means that patients can now receive a prescription from their doctor. If the doctor decides that there are no therapeutic alternatives to alleviate the patient’s suffering, the prescription allows the patient to obtain cannabis at the pharmacy. Although the restrictions have been lifted slightly, these processes are still strictly controlled by the BfArM.

The change in German law means that cannabis can now be prescribed as a pain killer by GPs
What is the current state of affairs in regards to legislation and what is the legal process for obtaining a license to cultivate cannabis?

With the legalization of cannabis, the BfArM established a cannabis agency within the institution to organize and control the cultivation of cannabis for medical use. As a result, a public tender has been released, and numerous companies have applied for the cultivation license.

Companies have to abide to strict guidelines to obtain a cultivation license
Of course, the process is taking much longer than expected, as this is a totally new field and the BfArM is asking for very specific qualifications: A company needs to have had some kind of past experience with cannabis products, they have to own indoor premises for the cultivation of the plants and have specific security measures in place in order to qualify.

Although we don’t have companies in Germany that have experience with growing cannabis, we do have some that have imported the plants from outside of Germany. They have significant experience in handling the product, be it through packaging or security measures.

For example, here in Germany there is a subsidiary of a larger Canadian company that has been producing the plants to a large extent. So this is a great advantage for them as they can build on their experience in Canada and fulfil the necessary requirements to qualify as legal cultivators.

You’ve been able to legally smoke weed in the Netherlands since the 1970’s, other countries like Italy and Denmark liberalized the medical use years ago. Germany seems quite slow in catching-up, why is that?

The legalization of cannabis for medical use in Germany occurred through a chain of unforeseeable events
Germany has one of the strictest narcotic drugs laws in Europe. In my opinion, if the German Federal Administrative Court hadn’t made a very specific decision, then the changes in legislation would never have been made. But through a chain of unforeseeable events, the following occurred:

One of the patients who had received the exemption from the BfArM, started growing his own cannabis at home, stating that the exemption included not only the purchase, but also the cultivation of cannabis. When BfArM sent him a cease and desist order, he took the issue to court.

In the last instance, the court ruled in his favour. This meant that all people who had previously received an exemption from BfArM would be able to legally grow cannabis at home. As this ruling would have resulted in a loss of control by the BfArM and in extension the government, cannabis was legalized for medical use and the complete control over cultivation and distribution returned to the government.

What role is Dentons playing in this whole transition process?

First and foremost we have been informing our international clients on regulatory issues and the new legislation in Germany. With cannabis everything is new, it’s a completely new field and different from any other topic in the life sciences.

THC – tetrahydrocannabinol – binds to specific cannabis receptors in the central and peripheral nervous systems
We have an international cannabis group at Dentons that is at the forefront of current affairs and keeps up to date on the topic. Our work includes regulatory advice, mergers and acquisitions and intellectual property. For instance, we have advised clients, one of them a large Canadian company, on the acquisition of a cannabis distributor in Germany to get a strong foothold in the country and on the European market.

In future, we will also have to handle various disputes. It will be very interesting to see how they evolve, how to handle them and their outcome. If one company, for example, receives the permission to cultivate cannabis in Germany and others don’t, then these decisions will certainly be challenged.

What can Germany… what can Europe learn from Canada?

Canada is well ahead in the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes. What is happening in Germany now is following the Canadian pattern: Today, we have a tender in the public procurement field that came from BfArM. It invited qualified companies to put forward their bid on specific cannabis plants in order to sell these to BfArM. In turn, BfArM will sell these plants to the pharmacies. Like in Canada, a government controlled process.

Germany can learn from Canada in issues of quality control as well. BfArM wants to overlook the cultivation and distribution process, because patients have to be able to count on a high quality product. Quality control includes specific laboratories, which check the type of insecticides or pesticides used or how much THC a plant contains.

There is much to learn from the Canadians, such as quality control, and cultivation and distribution processes
How do you see this niche developing from a legal but also from a medical perspective? What do you personally hope to see happen?

Our clients hope to see a greater liberalization, also for casual use. In my opinion this is not going to happen neither in Germany, nor in other countries in Europe. Nevertheless, more countries in the world are considering the medical use of cannabis and consequently, investors are looking into it as they expect a significant growth in the market.

We will also see a certain amount of effort put into research. With this new kind of liberalisation the indications that qualify for cannabinoid treatment have to be defined. Today we know that cannabis can help patients with for example chronic pain, cancer or multiple sclerosis, but in future we may discover more indications that will qualify for the treatment with cannabis.

“Germany has one of the strictest narcotic drugs laws in Europe”
Accordingly, the group of patients who can use cannabis as a medicinal product will grow. But the market in Germany is very competitive, so it will be interesting to see how companies and institutions will position themselves on the market to get a piece of the cake that is bound to become larger and larger every year.

Personally, I am glad that cannabis has been made available as a medicinal product for people who suffer severe pain. For many it is the best painkiller with less side effects than other drugs.

Want to learn more about the legal aspects of cannabis as a medicinal product? Visit Dentons here!

Images via Miss Nuchwara Tongrit, Africa Studio, Shutterstockphoto3, Zerbor/Shutterstock

What you need to Know about the Legalization of Cannabis for Medical Use