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Legal, regulatory obstacles preventing Canadian ‘Big Cannabis’ from diving headfirst into U.S. – from MJBiz Daily

August 10, 2017

Legal, regulatory obstacles preventing Canadian ‘Big Cannabis’ from diving headfirst into U.S.

(This is the second article of a four-part series examining how Canadian cannabis companies are expanding globally. Part I ran Aug. 9, and Parts III and IV will be published on Aug. 15-16.)

By Matt Lamers

Canadian cannabis companies eyeing U.S. medical and recreational marijuana markets can encounter a host of legal and regulatory pitfalls, prompting most of the big licensed producers to shun America altogether – at least for now.

“The rule right now is ‘no.’ You cannot do business in the United States,” said Aaron Keay, CEO of Ottawa-based ABcann Global, a licensed producer (LP) that trades on the TSX Venture Exchange under the ticker symbol ABCN.

In particular, the company doesn’t want to jeopardize its listing on the TSX Venture Exchange, given the stipulations laid out by the exchange’s parent company.

On its face, the United States is an attractive market:

  • Thirty states – plus Washington DC – have legalized medical marijuana.
  • Eight states also have legalized sales of recreational cannabis.

Canadian licensed producers seem poised to invade the U.S. industry, as many are spreading their wings to gain a first-mover advantage in newly legalized marijuana markets globally.

Most of these companies ultimately want a slice of the U.S. market, which could generate up to $9 billion in retail sales next year, according to the Marijuana Business Factbook 2017.

But several issues have made the United States off limits for some Canadian companies – notably the biggest players.

Hurdles aplenty 

Catch No. 1: MMJ exports to the United States are a nonstarter. Health Canada won’t issue an export license without an import certificate from a foreign counterpart – which can’t happen in the United States, because marijuana is illegal in the eyes of the U.S. government.

To get around the need for an export permit, some Canadian cannabis companies are investing directly in licensed producers based in the United States.

Catch No. 2: You’ll have a hard time listing on either of Canada’s two largest stock markets. TMX Group – the parent of the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSE) and the TSX Venture Exchange (TSXV) – mandates that its listed companies comply with relevant laws and regulations where they do business.

And because MMJ is illegal in the eyes of Uncle Sam, listed cannabis companies on Canada’s two biggest exchanges are technically not supposed to do business in the United States.

In fact, only one of the five cannabis companies on the TSE has cannabis-related assets in the United States, while around a dozen of the 47 cannabis stocks on the smaller Canadian Securities Exchange (CSE) have U.S. holdings.

Catch No. 3: You might have a limited ability to raise capital. While the CSE is a respected exchange, it doesn’t have nearly the clout, exposure to institutional investors, or access to capital that firms listed on the TSE and TSXV enjoy.

Big Canadian companies kept at bay

Ironically, U.S. prohibitions blocking the development of the cannabis industry on a national scale are shielding the country’s state-sanctioned cultivators from competing against well-capitalized and more experienced Canadian peers.

Most of the biggest licensed marijuana growers in Canada, behemoths compared to their under-capitalized American counterparts, are holding off on any U.S. expansion plans to avoid breaking laws in either country – and to stay in good standing with TMX Group regulations.

A case in point: The United States is a no-go zone for Alberta-based Aurora Cannabis (TSE: ACB).

“It has to be federally legal. We’ve got to make sure that everything we do is kosher with the exchange,” said Cam Battley, executive vice president of Aurora. “We will not touch anything in the U.S. while it’s federally illegal.”

Two years ago Aurora had a “growth strategy south of the Canadian border” – it agreed to build a production facility in Washington state – but the plan was superseded by the 2015 Canadian election. That plan is no longer in the cards.

“I’m very interested in the U.S. market, but I’m not going there until it’s federally legal, and we are not going to jeopardize our relationship with the TSE,” Battley said.

Saskatoon-based CanniMed Therapeutics (TSE: CMED) says it has a facility in the United States, but it’s not producing cannabis to avoid running afoul of regulators. But “when regulations change it’s something we can and will ramp up extremely quickly,” a company spokesperson said.

According to the company’s website, CanniMed’s wholly-owned subsidiary, SubTerra LLC of White Pine, Michigan, “is a key strategic asset in the Company’s longer-term strategy to service a potential medical cannabis market in the United States.”

Neil Closner, CEO of Markham, Ontario-based MedReleaf (TSE: LEAF), told Marijuana Business Daily the company only considers markets that are regulated at a federal level.

MedReleaf’s vice president of strategy, Darren Karasiuk, acknowledged the “substantial” potential of the U.S. market, but said “the company is not currently considering making any investments in the cannabis industry there, and would only consider doing so in the future after consideration of the impact on the company of all laws affecting any such investment and in compliance with all applicable guidance and requirements of the TSE.”

For Smiths Falls-based Canopy Growth Corp. (TSE: WEED), the United States is not currently on its radar.

“International expansion for CGC is only going to be done in jurisdictions where it’s federally legal to do so,” said a spokesperson.

Keay, the CEO of ABcann Global, said he’s keeping an eye on opportunities south of the border and communicates on a regular basis with executives in the country.

But “right now we cannot go down that path because we’re listed on the TSX,” he said. “You can’t right now. But I have my eye on it. It’s the land of some of the biggest consumer products in the world.”

Some undeterred 

Still, some analysts and Canadian executives are bullish on the U.S. cannabis sector’s potential – and a few licensed cannabis producers have entered the American market.

Vahan Ajamian, an analyst at Canada’s Beacon Securities, sees great potential in the U.S. market as more states legalize medical and adult-use cannabis, but notes “it’s really 50 separate markets” owing to the plant’s illegal status at the federal level.

“We are big believers in the U.S. opportunity,” he said.

Among the five cannabis companies trading on the TSE, only one is actively involved in the U.S. marijuana market.

Leamington, Ontario-based Aphria (TSE: APH), which boasts a “U.S. expansion strategy,” has business interests in Arizona and Florida, and belongs to a partnership vying for a license to grow medicinal cannabis in Ohio.

Through Aphria (Arizona) Inc., Aphria owns 18.5% of Copperstate Farms Investors, which in turn has a 95% interest in Copperstate Farms – a licensed medical cannabis producer in Arizona.

In Florida, Aphria’s stake in Liberty Health Sciences gives it a financial interest in an MMJ company operating in a state poised to become a major market for medical cannabis.

Liberty Health Sciences CEO George Scorsis told Marijuana Business Daily his company is focused exclusively on the United States “because of its tremendous opportunity.”

Scorsis’ strategy involves going into markets that are “completely medical. That’s one premise we will never deviate from. Second, we look at states that do not have canopy restrictions, because that permits us to grow at a scale of greenhouse that allows us to be the lowest cost producer. We also like states that have high barriers to entry.”

With a market cap of CA$100 million ($79 million), Ottawa-based CannaRoyalty (CSE: CRZ) is one of the larger companies on the CSE with investments in the United States.

Marc Lustig – CEO of the marijuana-focused investment company – told Marijuana Business Daily that, regardless of the federal policies, the United States “is the largest opportunity and will be for some time.” 

CannaRoyalty has financial stakes in cannabis companies operating in Washington state, Oregon, California and Arizona.

It’s also indirectly involved in Florida, where one of its investee companies, AltMed, agreed to combine its Florida operations with Plants of Ruskin. It’s also looking at Nevada, Massachusetts and Maryland.

“Our whole strategy is surrounding producers with the whole toolbox that they need,” Lustig said. “We’re building a diversified company across different product segments, and across multiple geographies.”

Matt Lamers can be reached at mattl@mjbizdaily.com.


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How Medical Cannabis Could Treat Parkinson’s Disease – by Julie Godard

Over the past two decades, medical cannabis has become an alternative treatment option for many medical patients across the globe.

While medical studies in this area are by no means complete, there have been many promising findings both in the medical lab and outside of it, which may be indicators of future treatments that could be based on medical cannabis. A disease called Parkinson’s disease has recently moved to the forefront of medical investigation involving medical cannabis treatments.

What is Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative brain disorder that occurs when there is a slow reduction in the amount of dopamine produced in the human brain’s nerve cells. Dopamine is the brain chemical that allows coordinated and smooth muscle movements in the body.

Because the disease affects a person’s movements and begins gradually, and because there is no laboratory test for the disease, it can be difficult to spot early on. Through a thorough examination of a patient’s medical history and repeated neurological exams, most cases can be diagnosed. Parkinson’s disease is not generally diagnosed in younger people; age 60 is the age when it usually begins to affect a patient. For the disease to affect a patient noticeably, 60-80 percent of a patient’s nerve cells must be affected. Early warning signs of Parkinson’s disease include:

  • Tremors or shaking
  • Small handwriting
  • Loss of sense of smell
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Moving or walking issues
  • Constipation
  • Soft or low voice
  • Masked face
  • Dizziness/fainting
  • Stooping

While Parkinson’s disease is not fatal, complications from it can be, and there is no cure. The goal of treatment is to provide the most high-quality life possible once the disease has been diagnosed.

ADHD Cannabis

What are the Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease?

There are four main stages of Parkinson’s disease, all accompanied by their own symptoms. Stage one involves mild symptoms that do not interfere with normal, everyday activities of patients – tremor and other movement symptoms occur, but only on one side of the body. Changes in posture, walking, and facial expressions may become apparent to friends or family at this stage.

In stage two, tremors and rigidity may appear on both sides of the body, and walking and posture issues are obvious. Daily tasks may become more difficult or take longer, but the patient should still be self-sufficient. Stage three often includes loss of balance and slower movements, possibly with frequent falls. Independence is still possible, but dressing and eating may become more and more difficult at this stage.

In stage four, symptoms of Parkinson’s disease may require help from a walker and help with daily tasks – this usually results in a loss of independence. Help from family, a friend, or a nurse that either visits daily or lives with the patient may now be required. In stage five, leg stiffness may prevent the patient from walking, and require 24-hour nursing care. Although most symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are commonly associated with physical issues, the following non-motor symptoms are also common, particularly in stage five:

  • Depression and anxiety
  • Issues with focused attention, planning, slow thoughts, language and memory
  • Personality changes
  • Dementia, hallucinations, or delusions
  • Orthostatic hypotension
  • Sleep disorders
  • Constipation
  • Lack of appetite
  • Pain and fatigue
  • Vision problems
  • Excessive sweating
  • Sexual issues
  • Weight loss or gain
  • Impulsive control disorders

What Medical Treatments are Available for Parkinson’s Disease?

Among the types of medical treatment that have been shown to decrease symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are surgery, deep brain stimulation (DBS), and various prescribed medications (most common are carbidopa/levodopa, Sinemet, Azilect, Mirapex, ropinirole, and Requip). In DBS, surgically implanted electrodes in the brain block electrical pulses from nerve cells that cause unwanted movements, stopping tremors and other Parkinson’s disease symptoms.

A doctor may use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scans to identify parts of the brain producing unwanted movements prior to surgery. DBS uses surgical insertion of a neurostimulator (similar in size to a stopwatch or heart pacemaker) which delivers to electrical stimulation to targeted brain areas. DBS usually involves the thalamus, subthalamic nucleus, and the globus pallidus. DBS is used only for patients who do not respond to other medications and treatments, and is an invasive procedure. Medical cannabis could help prevent such a procedure, and provide an option that Parkinson’s disease patients could use in the privacy of their own homes.

Asia CBD

Image credit- Strong CBD Oil

How Can Medical Cannabis Help Parkinson’s Disease Patients?

The National Parkinson’s Foundation acknowledges the current medical cannabis investigations occurring for Parkinson’s disease patients, noting that several anecdotal reports show reduced tremors in Parkinson’s patients. “Ride with Larry” is a three-part documentary involving Larry, a man with severe Parkinson’s disease who chose to consume medical cannabis to help with his tremors and other symptoms. Because medical cannabis can interact with neurological cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), it affects the brain and can calm tremors in some patients.

In general, people with Parkinson’s disease have fewer CB1 receptors than people without it; boosting CB1 receptors with medical cannabis seems to alleviate dyskinesia and reduce tremors. The difficulty of conducting medical cannabis trials for Parkinson’s disease has been and is still affected by national and international laws regarding the use of medical cannabis, as well as the difficulty of conducting a double-blind, placebo controlled trial with medical cannabis. However, some patients are positive that medical cannabis helps their tremors, and have posted videos of the treatment working on websites such as YouTube. In one pilot study, nabilone (a cannabinoid receptor agonist) significantly reduced dyskinesia in seven patients with Parkinson’s disease. Several other studies have shown different results, including tic benefits but no dyskinesia benefits.

A more recent study conducted in Europe has demonstrated that some Parkinson’s patients enjoy both pain relief and improved motor function following medical cannabis treatments. Parkinson’s disease patients in areas of the world where medical cannabis is legal have the option to discuss this form of treatment with their doctors or healthcare professionals if they are not responding to medications or DBS, but more clinical trials are needed to find reliable results for this treatment.

 

How Medical Cannabis Could Treat Parkinson’s Disease

 

 

 

 

 


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CHONG’S CHOICE CBD – by Diamond CBD, Inc.

PotNetwork Holding Inc. (OTC: POTN) announced that Tommy Chong, counter-culture legend, marijuana legalization advocate and half of the incomparable creative team of Cheech & Chong, has selected its subsidiary, Diamond CBD, Inc., as his partner to introduce a proprietary brand of hemp-derived CBD oil products, under the brand name, Chong’s Choice CBD. Tommy’s brand will include CBD-infused edibles, concentrated solvent-free vaping additives and hemp oil tincture drops. Production of the new line is expected to begin within a month, with immediate online availability. As Tommy’s partner, Diamond CBD will offer the new brand to its distribution channels and assist in overall marketing. Tommy Chong stated, “I use Diamond CBD products and love them. They help me relax and often soothe the occasional pain of an old stoner.” He continued, “I want to be part of this 21st century CBD revolution which promises unprecedented health benefits to millions of people and Diamond CBD has a premier line of products, many of which I am pleased to bring to the market under my brand.”

Gary Blum, Chief Executive Officer, PotNetwork Holding, added, “We are honored to get to work closely with Tommy, and anticipate this partnership will further solidify Diamond CBD as the category leader in beneficial CBD products.”

 

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PATIENT UPDATE: The patients in the study had used opioid-based pain medication within the past six months: 97 percent were able to decrease their opiate intake with cannabis, 92 percent said that cannabis possessed fewer adverse side-effects than opioids, 80 percent said that the use of medical cannabis alone provided greater symptom management than did their use of opioids.

Berkeley, CA: Pain patients report successfully substituting cannabis for opioids and other analgesics, according to data published online in the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research.

Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley and Kent State University in Ohio assessed survey data from a cohort of 2,897 self-identified medical cannabis patients.

Among those who acknowledged having used opioid-based pain medication within the past six months, 97 percent agreed that they were able to decrease their opiate intake with cannabis. Moreover, 92 percent of respondents said that cannabis possessed fewer adverse side-effects than opioids. Eighty percent of respondents said that the use of medical cannabis alone provided greater symptom management than did their use of opioids.

Among those respondents who acknowledged having recently taken nonopioid-based pain medications, 96 percent said that having access to cannabis reduced their conventional drug intake. Ninety-two percent of these respondents opined that medical cannabis was more effective at treating their condition than traditional analgesics.

The study’s conclusions are similar to those of several others, such as these herehereherehere, and here, finding reduced prescription drug use and spending by those with access to cannabis. Separate studies report an association between cannabis access and lower rates of opioid-related abuse, hospitalizations, traffic fatalities, and overdose deaths.

For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Cannabis as substitute for opioid-based pain medication: patient self-report,” appears in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research.norml


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German Medical Marijuana Patients face mounting struggles to secure their medicine, while companies from the US and elsewhere are forbidden to help. #shameful

 

 

Criticism of the cannabis lawThe struggle for cannabis

In March the policy was celebrated: cannabis on prescription – a breakthrough! But many patients are dissatisfied. The funds do not want to pay the costs, the pharmacies are struggling with supply bottlenecks. The fight for hemp is in full swing.

By Christin Jordan, SWR

Magdalena Sebelka has epilepsy, ADHD and severe asthma. She has already tried a few medications – helped only cannabis.

As with the 10th of March, cannabis can be prescribed for prescription and bought at the pharmacy. The new law makes it possible for the funds to pay the costs. As far as the theory. Practically, around 1000 people in Germany have already been allowed to buy and consume cannabis products in pharmacies with an exception. But they had to pay it out of their own pocket.

In severe diseases such as cancer, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis or pain patients, medical cannabis is used for therapy. The hemp blossoms are imported, certified cultivating plants are available in Canada, the USA and the Netherlands.

Fighting with the health insurance companies

The young woman has an exception license, issued by the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices. So far she has received a prescription from the doctor and has been able to buy and consume hemp flowers – at her own expense. Your hope in the law was great. Then the disappointment: your doctor prescribes her the drug, but she must continue to pay for it herself. The checkout refuses to take over the costs.

According to the law, the first regulation has to be submitted and approved by a health insurance company at the health insurance – but this is rejected by Sebelkas Kasse. It is not proven that cannabis is the only active ingredient that helps her.

Many affected parties also report in Internet forums about the struggle with the coffers. Your guess: It’s about money. Because cannabino therapy is expensive – an average patient costs around 9000 euros per year.

Cannabis as a last resort

The leading association of statutory health insurance funds rejects the charge of wanting to save costs. The funds would have to adhere to the law whereby cannabis products can only be used as cash-in-service if no other therapy helps.

In addition, since the entry into force of the Act on 10th March, 1000 cost-taking has already been approved by the funds, so the number of legal cannabis users has risen significantly.

But why do people with an old exception permit like Magda Sebelka not automatically claim to be covered by the health insurance funds provided for by the new law? According to Speaker Florian Lanz, there is no legal basis for this. There was no provision for the existence of existing populations for the old patients; every regulation had to be examined separately, which could also reject cash applications – as in many other therapies.

Legal, but expensive

One gram of cannabis flowers costs 25 euros in the pharmacy – a lot of money for those who are self-paying. Sebelka reports that since the introduction of the law the price of medical cannabis products has almost doubled. The reason was that the pharmacists had to calculate the goods according to the German drug regulation. The German Association of German Pharmacists’ Associations rejects this – cannabis has always had to be treated as a medicinal product like any other medicinal plant. “I can not understand the alleged price increases,” explains deputy press singer Ursula Sellerberg.

Limited cannabis

But patients who have accepted the cost of taking over the costs can still not breathe. Medical cannabis is currently scarce, the foreign suppliers can not meet the needs. “Of ten cannabis medicines, I can only offer one at the moment”, says the chief pharmacist Martin Schmidt. He can only provide his regular customers – if new cash patients with cannabis recipes came, they probably went empty. Schmidt sees the fault with the policy: “The law was a quick shot, one had to have thought about where these quantities of medical cannabis products should come from.”

A quick solution is not in sight. Germany wants to build a state cannabis agency and control cannabis cultivation – however only two years. Until then, Magda Sebelka may perhaps consume at the expense of the cash box cannabis – she complains in an urgent case against the decision.

Your opinion about:Kritik am Gesetz für legalen Cannabiskonsum

July 26, 2017 – 11:22

A hemp plant

In March the policy was celebrated: cannabis on prescription – a breakthrough! But many patients are dissatisfied. The funds do not want to pay the costs, the pharmacies are struggling with supply bottlenecks. The fight for hemp is in full swing. By Christin Jordan.

Article on tagesschau.de

Comments

Finally legalize costs

Finally legalize, save money! There are arguments against it, but then one would have to honestly forbid alcohol etc.

What would the police finally release? You will not move the potatoes if you criminalize it. Consumption has been steadily increasing for years. We must pay the police.

The market regulates …

… the price and that is good so. And that the checkout does not pay is correct. I would not like to finance a cannabis as a cashier. Basta.

Simply laughable …

Delivery bottlenecks at something every 17 year old can grow. Welcome to Germany.
And what is the idea of ​​allowing hemp first when opiates do not have the desired effect?
Just look to Holland – the kids there are not as big as the one here – simply because it is nothing special – you can buy in the coffeeshop, nice to smoke there and then as after a beer to go home, the stub on the Way smoking and done.
The drilldown made here around the story is simply laughable.

Build yourself

If I was in a desperate situation would have a serious illness and would have to fight with bad pain, I would be mildly shed, whether the cultivation is illegal.
Then the just a seriously sick man in the jail are stuck …..

@ Ruffian

“I do not want to co-finance a cannabis as a cashier.” Basta. ”

I hope they stay healthy. My wife was not lucky enough, and cannabis is the only active ingredient of the (including).

@karawanke

“The market regulates the price”
The road price is around 10, – EUR per gram and thus far less than half as what pharmacies demand.

“And that the checkout does not pay is right.”
No it is not. The legal situation is clear and the coffers have to submit to this!

“I do not want to finance a cannabis as a cashier.”
And I do not want to co-finance your surgery and chemo if you get cancer, preferably by smoking. Or your physiotherapy when you break your bones while skiing. But I must. Therefore, your “desire” is irrelevant.

@ Karawanke

>>> I would like to co-finance no cannabis as a cashier. Basta.
,
Cannabis is cheaper and more effective than alternative products. Also less harmful / side effects than chemical drugs.
As a cashier, I would rather pay cannabis than an artificial, overpriced product of the pharmaceutical industry.

The only reasonable solution is

The free sale to all in pharmacies, or separate shops. Then there are also no bottlenecks. On the contrary, a new, lucrative industry for all parties would be created, decriminalizing consumers, thereby relieving the police / courts and generating tax revenues.

It is already disappointing

It is already disappointing to see how the health insurance companies are squirming, just not having to pay … what they actually have to do according to the law, so almost every complaint against social courts is also successful.

It’s damn cynical when one forces patients to be forced into illegality again.

Whoever can afford it and does not want to act illegally, can issue a private recipe. So what do you call two-class medicine ?!

Yes, I also like to see when my health insurance contributions are spent on safe and helpful substances like cannabis! To refuse a patient’s medicine is simply immoral (aka “is not at all!”).

Prices not traceable

“Because cannabino therapy is expensive – an average patient costs around 9000 euros per year.”

And what would be the cost if the legislator were to equate cannabis with the tobacco – 100 euros?

Looks to Uruguay

And learn how to do something like that!

Legal health insurance is called …

… the legislator defines the conditions, and that makes him very stringent and very concrete. Paragraph 12 of Book V of the Social Insurance Code states that
“(1) benefits must be sufficient, appropriate and economic, and must not exceed the extent of what is necessary.” Insured persons are not entitled to benefits which are not necessary or uneconomical And do not grant health insurance funds. ”
In this respect, the GKVs may only authorize if the conditions of § 31 (6) SGB V are fulfilled. In particular, no alternative recognized therapeutic method may be available for the purpose of use (cannabis is almost everywhere else).
To this extent, the hope of German consumers,

@karawanke

“I do not want to co-finance a cannabis as a cashier.” Basta. “… but the lush profit margins of the pharmaceutical industry … no further comment needed

Prices not traceable!

The pharmacy wants 25 €?
On the street the price is 10 to 12 €.

Who as a chronic patient illigal a Hanfzucht cabinet poses thereby long-term producer prices of under 3 € the gram realize.
On a large scale professionally cultivated hemp products would be spottbillig !!! “Pfennig Amounts” for the gram!

They would be cheaper than most pharma alternatives and the health insurance funds would be financially relieved by hemp medicine.

Earlier, hemp was grown on German fields. This was because of the fibers, but was the same kind.
Hemp cultivation is relatively easy: hemp is robust, needs little to no use of chemistry and the soil needs little preparation. For this purpose it is relatively dry-resistant (grows well on Moroccan fields).

The fact that we have supply bottlenecks and usurious prices is the only political failure!

@ Karawanke “no cannabis co-finance”

Aha?!

How is it with opioids? They finance you through your health insurance contributions on a grand scale.

Or benzodiazepines? A not insignificant proportion of the drug addicts are attributed to this drug. They also finance you.

What about amphetamines? You are funding Ritalin and others about your contributions.

What about cocaine derivatives? Lidocaine and other local anesthetics …

What I want to tell you: Many drug classes, which you know as an illigal drug, have at the same time a high medical potential, which has always been widely used.

The active ingredients in hemp also have high medical potential. And the side effects are relatively harmless compared to all the above active substance classes! These are facts, the medical world is largely in agreement. And although this is not in the sense of the pharmaceutical lobby.

From a scientific point of view, it is a scandal that a modern enlightened country like Germany so far does not use these drugs

@spetzki

Cent amounts per gram are nonsense! That would only go on the field so cheap and then the quality is not given. For medical purposes it is cultivated in enclosed spaces wherever it is allowed. There is the driving cost factor alone the current.

It is the GKV’s in Germany for a long time only around …

…Money.
Not only in patients who need cannabis, since other agents either do not help or have too much side effects.

Is not different with me.
My pain therapy costs around
2,662 € a year.
For cannabis it would be 3-4 times as expensive.
The big difference is that cannabis has much less side effects and is therefore less harmful to the body.
After all, I am talking about a lifelong application of the preparations.
At the moment I have to take Oxycodon acute (4 times daily).
With Hemp I need substantially less to zero.

But the coffers do not care.
Alone the regulation that if there is another means, cannabis not or difficult to maintain or even be bought at own expense, drives many people into the madness and ruin.

No, our health care system & The responsible politicians also take care of
the patient.

It’s just about money.

@ 11: 31 from OrwellAG – so please, it is not about the …

… Consumption of a killer who would like to have a intoxication.

It is a question of adopting a law that gives people free access to their medicine.

And then the cashiers are straining themselves with the simple assertion that there are substitute medications which the patient must take.
Or the patient has to pay himself.
The Otto-normal patient can not do this.
Especially since most people who need such a drug anyway can no longer work.

@ no idea


To be economical” “in particular, no alternative recognized method of healing may be available for the purpose of use (cannabis is almost everywhere else).”

Hemp is one of the oldest cultivated and medicinal plants of mankind.
This is not a new idea. And it is not an “alternative healing method”! This is not a Bachblütentee – hemp contains highly potent active ingredients.
They are well-known and well-researched active ingredients.
Hemp has been tried for decades to demonize (and still can not present any facts).
The fact is, in many cases, hemp should be the first choice, because:
– very low potential for side effects
– if done right
– unbeatable – great patient compliance. Many patients prefer a traditional herbal drug to a modern drug.

From the passages you quoted, I interpret that hemp medicine needs to be promoted more strongly.

@ Donidon: field went

One has to ask, of course, how the use of these drugs should develop in the long term.
I think: In the same as for all other active ingredients also: standardized medical products: tablets, drops, … suppositories 🙂

This would mean that the active ingredients are dissolved from the plant material and isolated and standardized products are produced therefrom.
For this application, the active ingredient content in the plant material may fluctuate smoothly.

And so “Pfennigsbeträge” can be realized.

If the hemp flower should have as much as possible reproducible concentrations of active ingredients, then you are right: you have to keep all parameters constant, including lighting, nutrient supply (via hydroponic systems), temperature and humidity.

It is not the best solution to leave the hemp flower to the patient. Because this self-medication (smoking, evaporating, baking cookies, …) is inaccurate and less effective than modern forms of administration.

11:49 by karawanke

“And that the cash box does not pay is correct, I would not like to finance a cannabis as cashier.” Basta. ”

Then I wish you heartfeltly that you will never get into the situation, that cannabis is the only way to live a certain human life and die later. My husband has ALS. Both (first and second) motoneuron are affected. Particularly painful are the muscle cramps. His doctor would prescribe in the cannabis, the cashier does not pay. For the other medicines, he has to reckon with enormous side effects, eg liver damage.

There are growing countries

There are more and more countries cunning and legalizing cannabis, why we have to make it more complicated than it is.
We leave it over pharmacies, health insurance and doctors, which is a bureaucracy.
Everyone is able to cultivate cannabis and it is made everywhere. So just legalize it and we save money and trouble.
This is a billion dollar market the D left. Cannabis has always been consumed. The purchase is as easy as buying biscuits.
This could create thousands of jobs in D, instead the pharmaceutical industry is supported, so they can sell their expensive preparations.
Even America has recognized this market. To ban a naturally growing plant and brewed beer, Baked liquor, & c. That’s funny!
D always notes it at the end!
I hope I ever experience the complete legalization!

“They are well-known and well-researched drugs.”

You should not write something, just to write something.
You can count yourself as an employee of a sawmill on one hand for an effective study for the treatment of diseases or even for the adjuvant use of dronabinol or nabilone. Evident studies, however, are a compelling basis for the preparation of therapiesand guidelines of the specialist companies.
In this respect, you can put your “facts” at least in health care in 99.5% of cases for the coming years, where the sun rarely has an opportunity to see them.
Because in exactly this relation, there are standardized procedures that are cheaper than cannabis on Rp. – and then we must prescribe this, The cash registers are not allowed to grant more expensive procedures and the patient can not claim them. That’s the way – and I do not want to be embarrassed to pay the bags of my patients myself.

We own one

We have an endocannabinoid system where the cannabinoids CBD, THC & Co. (over 100 exist) can dock. We also produce our own cannabinoids ourselves. However, since the research on cannabis has been suppressed for so long, studies are often lacking, and therefore the evidence. Look at all the people in the world to be scolded at the “Kiffer”. They are often better with the herb than with chemically produced “medicine”, the cannabis need only be determined, reaped, dried and taken.

As always, it is about maximizing profit, if patients have to suffer (see cancer medication). Not only does methadone show surprising results, cannabis too!

Doctor, “That makes psychoses!”
Patient: This with psychoses and cannabis is a hen and egg problem.

(Satire)
Is the risk of an induced psychosis very high when a “doctor” hears the word “cannabis”? Or was a psychosis VS ‘cannabis as medicine’, already there before?
(Satire off)

It is definitely harmful to health

Unfortunately, one must always keep in mind that the abuse of cannabis is a drug addictive and, just like drinking alcohol, is a serious damage to the nervous system.
Beautiful staining and Kiffer-Idyll bring there nothing.

Closing of the commentary function

Dear users,

Due to the high number of comments on meta.tagesschau.de, the news can not be commented at the moment.
We ask for your understanding.

Sincerely,
The Moderation


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Tommy Chong rumored to be re-appearing at ICBC Berlin

ICBC Berlin - The BERLIN PEACE ACCORDS...putting an end to the world war on Cannabis!

ICBC BERLIN will be held April 12-13, 2018 in Berlin Germany.

Tommy Chong and his CHONGS CHOICE offerings http://chongschoice.us/ were well-received by the international cannabis executives this year and rumor has it he will be there again in 2018.

For more information on this HIGHLY RECOMMENDED event, please go to:

http://internationalcbc.com/berlin-home/


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Canada expecting widespread shortage of cannabis within a year…exports expected to be impacted.

An official with a large Canadian producer of medical cannabis is confident consumers will be adequately supplied come next July, but says production will need to be increased.

“Right now, the existing capacity and what is already envisioned will not be sufficient to meet the needs of the adult consumer market,” Cam Battley, executive vice-president of Aurora Cannabis Inc., said in an interview Monday.

He has urged other companies to ramp up their production ahead of next July 1, when recreational marijuana is expected to be legalized.

“We need to expand our capacity right away simply to meet the demands of the rapidly growing medical cannabis system,” Battley said. “When the demand of the adult consumer system is layered on top of that, it’s a rush to build as much capacity as possible.”

Battley made the comments on the same day that Aurora began trading common shares on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

Alberta-based Aurora, one of several producers now listed on the TSX, is building what it describes as the world’s largest cannabis production facility at Edmonton International Airport.

Battley said Canada has a well-developed and successful medical cannabis system.

“This is a coming of age, not just for Aurora, but for the cannabis sector and what we’re seeing now is that Canada has established itself as the world leader in a brand new emerging industry that we are literally inventing in real time,” he said.

Battley added that officials from around the world have been coming to his facility in Alberta to visit and to learn how Canada has been so successful both on the medical side and on the consumer side.

Marijuana leaf Tweed

Health Canada says there are more than 60 authorized licensed producers of cannabis for medical purposes in Canada. (Photo courtesy of Allan Ziolkowski)

“There’s something very big happening and it’s a global movement and it is being led out of Canada.”

Jordan Sinclair, director of communications for Canopy Growth Corp., another major medical cannabis producer, agrees.

“There’s no doubt that we already are …that Canada is the global leader in cannabis on the medical side certainly,” he said.

“The demand doesn’t seem to be slowing down on the medical side of things and then with recreation, obviously that’s a massive market opportunity.”

Sinclair pointed out that Canopy, whose headquarters are in a former Hershey chocolate factory in Smiths Falls, southwest of Ottawa, was first listed on the big board of the TSX in July 2016.

“We’re very proud to have done that before anyone else in the country,” he added. “It does seem like now the pace is speeding up with other companies following in our footsteps (and) it signals that there is credibility across the sector.”

On its website, Health Canada says there are more than 52 authorized licensed producers of cannabis for medical purposes.

Ontario has issued 29 licences, followed by British Columbia with 12.

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/business/cannabis-consumer-demand-1.4219753?mc_cid=12994fc045&mc_eid=cd290ff91e