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The UN Commission of Narcotic Drugs (CND) will receive the final scheduling recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO) on cannabis in all forms to the 187 Member States at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) headquarters in Vienna, Austria on December 5-7, 2018.

More info here:
==========
Philip J. Cenedella IV
www.cenedella.de
Skype: philip.j.cenedella
Phones:   +49.151.720.17652
+1.888.206.3264 USA

German Tax No.: 38/108/04462

VAT No.:  DE313501847

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION: E-mails from this individual normally contain confidential and privileged material, and are for the sole use of the intended recipient. Use or distribution by an unintended recipient is prohibited. If you believe that you received this e-mail in error, please delete. Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. 2510-2521. Thanks.  Copyright © 2018 GERMAN PATIENT ROUNDTABLE – All Rights Reserved.   ** Your personal data will never be shared with anyone, …never.  The German Patient Roundtable is dedicated to Ras Manos, R.I.P.


German cannabis lawyer KFN+ with good update on the German Cannabis As Medicine Cultivation, revised bid.

After the first award procedure for the cultivation of medical cannabis in Germany had been banned by the Higher Regional Court of Düsseldorf now the time has finally come and the Cannabis Agency has published the details of the new award procedure.

The Federal Republic of Germany, represented by the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) and the Cannabis Agency, continues to be the contracting authority for the award procedure for the cultivation, further processing, storage, packaging and supply of cannabis for medical purposes. This concerns the award of a public contract by way of an open procedure in accordance with §§ 97 et seqq. GWB (German Act against Restraint of Competition) and § 15 VgV (Regulations on the Award of Public Contracts and Procedures).

Prospective parties must prove their economic and financial capacity of the last 3 years when filing an application. Information must also be provided on sales in the cultivation, processing and supply of cannabis for medical purposes (THC content ≥ 1%) for the last 3 financial years, if available. Turnover in the cultivation, supply and processing of medicinal plants which have been placed on the market as medicinal products or active agents in a medicinal product after processing may also be considered as commendation now. The minimum condition for affirming suitability is then at least one cannabis reference for the cultivation of medical cannabis or one cultivation and processing reference for medicinal plants. The services provided must have been performed in accordance with both the GACP standard (Good Agricultural and Collection Practice) and the GMP standard (Good Manufacturing Standards), i.e. in accordance with the „Eudralex: Volume 4 Medicinal Products for Human and Veterany Use and Annex 7: Manufacture of Herbal Medicinal Products“, whereby approval for the manufacture of medicinal products must have been obtained from the competent authority ex ante.

If the contract is awarded Information must also be provided on how the financing of the contract is secured, and that the named land plot is available for the production site.

With regard to economic, financial, technical and professional capacity, a bidder may make use of the capacities of other companies within the framework of the so-called qualification hire. Thus, bidding consortia are also permitted, where the minimum conditions set must be fulfilled by at least one member of the bidding consortia.

The services are awarded by lot. The delivery quantity per batch is 200 kg per year. The following lots are set up:

Lot 1 to lot 8: cannabis flowers type 1

Lot 9 to lot 11: cannabis flowers type 2

Lot 12 and lot 13: cannabis flowers type 3

The cannabis flowers to be delivered must – depending on type respectively lot – contain the following concentration of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD):

type 1 with definition: THC between 18 and 22%, CBD < 1%

type 2 with definition: THC between 12 and 16%, CBD < 1%

type 3 with definition: THC between 5 and 9%, CBD between 5 and 9%.

Bidders may submit tenders for all lots, whereby one bidder may receive a maximum of 5 lots.

The delivery shall cover the following periods and quantities in total:

Delivery schedule of total quantity for the defined types

  1. Delivery year 2600 kg (type 1 1600 kg, type 2 600 kg, type 3  400 kg)
  2. Delivery year 2600 kg (type 1 1600 kg, type 2 600 kg, type 3  400 kg)
  3. Delivery year 2600 kg (type 1 1600 kg, type 2 600 kg, type 3  400 kg)
  4. Delivery year 2600 kg (type 1 1600 kg, type 2 600 kg, type 3  400 kg)

The award criteria are determined by a scoring system. The bidder with the lowest price offer for medical cannabis in the specified quality (detailed in euros per gram) receives 40 points. Another maximum of 5 points can be achieved by the quality of:

– the concept of technical facilities of the plant,

– the structural standards,

– the concept for GACP and GMP- standard,

– the concepts for cultivation, processing and delivery (e.g. with regard to prevention of failed harvests),

– the concept for production cycles,

– the concept for selection and training of personnel,

– safety and security concept.

When bidding, a concept for scheduling in the starting phase up to the first harvest with the respective intermediate steps must be submitted. The concept of the site and production must be described in detail for all stages to enable the cannabis agency to evaluate the award criteria. The origin and characteristics of the seed or plant material used must also be described in detail. The crucial technical facilities must also be particularised in concrete terms.

At the time of purchase capacity, the cannabis flowers must be appropriate for medical use. They must comply with the legal requirements of the current monography for cannabis flowers of the German Pharmacopoeia and the European Pharmacopoeia. With regard to heavy metal contamination certain limit values must be satisfied. The cultivation must also have been carried out according to the currently valid European GACP and GMP standards (see above) of course.

Conclusion: the new tender procedure slightly increases the quantities to be produced, which of course constitutes improvement. A cultivation and processing reference for medicinal plants is also sufficient to meet the minimum requirements. The quantities put out to tender however are still so meagre that it remains in doubt whether or not the production of medical cannabis in Germany can actually be of economic interest to interested companies. In view of the already approved import quantities of 21 tonnes in 2018 and a further increase in demand it remains cloudy why the German Federal Government is blocking the production of medical cannabis in their own country by tendering out such small quantities rather than giving a new and emerging industry in the country a chance.


Günter Weiglein wins battle in Court!

Cannabis pain patient succeeds in the appellate
court district court: proceedings for illegal cannabis cultivation set – Günter Weiglein takes medicinal hemp against chronic pain

WÜRZBURG.
Saturday, 30.06.2018 – 00:00 h
Günter Weiglein from Würzburg suffers from constant pain. As one of the first in Germany, the 53-year-old was allowed to legally buy cannabis for pain relief. Because this financially overwhelmed him, he grew hemp himself, was caught in 2016 and warned in court. He did not want to let that sit on him.

At the appeal hearing, his fight ended relatively quickly.

Weiglein’s ordeal began in 2002. In a traffic accident, he broke several bones. Since then he lives with permanent pain, especially in the left pelvic area. He could walk only 100 to 200 meters, then had to stand a minute, because it hurt so much, he described Appellate Justice Konrad Döpfner at the Würzburg district court.

Relief without side effect

The Würzburger went through all conceivable drug therapies – with significant side effects such as nausea, sweating, restless sleep. The cannabis does not eliminate the duration of pain, but alleviate it without the side effects.

When Weiglein started smoking cannabis, he claims to use six grams of medicinal hemp per day. One gram had cost 15 euros. Today, the prices would be 20 to 24 euros. Too much for the Würzburg, who currently needs eight grams per day and has to rely on the earnings of his wife of around 2600 euros.

To avoid that, Weiglein himself grew hemp. When police stopped by for an ad, they found several cannabis plants with about eight grams usable proportion and seven grams of dried hemp flowers: This Weiglein violated the narcotics law.

Mild judgment in the lower court

In the trial on 30 November 2017, the judge ruled mildly in light of Weiglein’s situation: warning instead of fine, but with punishment. The Würzburger would have to pay 300 euros, he would be caught again. This would be a new criminal case.

Weiglein appealed. It was also about the principle. He was one of three plaintiffs before the Cologne administrative court, the right to self-cultivation. However, the responsible Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices issued no approval, appealed the verdict.

Before it could be decided, the Bundestag adopted in spring 2017 a law on cannabis as medicine. The health insurance companies have to actually pay for it. Weiglein’s hemp cultivation was facing this change.

In front of the Würzburg district court, Weigleins lawyer Matthias Schillo argued that it was impossible for his client to bear the high costs. He had only the choice to endure the pain or to get the necessary drug elsewhere – which was done by self-cultivation.

Although the accused fulfilled the offense under the Narcotics Act, he had not acted unlawfully. He could invoke the protected right to free development of his personality, the right to life and physical integrity. That weighs in the case heavier than the legal provisions.

Cost bears state treasury

Judge Döpfner brought two judgments of the Federal Court, which in principle state that who grows without permission hemp, makes itself punishable. Nevertheless, he stopped the proceedings with the consent of all involved. The cost of the procedure is borne by the State Treasury. For Weiglein a “bearable exit”. Every euro he would have had to pay would have made him feel guilty, he said.

Meanwhile, he and Schillo have reached with his health insurance that she paid him the medical hemp. He also found a Würzburg pharmacy, which supplies him relatively reliably despite general supply shortages. Weiglein still can not grow hemp. That he would do that, if it were not otherwise – he left no doubt on demand.

stst


German cultivation tender for medical marijuana stopped in its tracks…..and information on the GERMAN PATIENT ROUNDTABLE www.germanpatientroundtable.de

https://www.cannabisindustryjournal.com/news_article/german-court-stops-pending-cannabis-cultivation-bid-on-technical-fault/

German Patients are Going to be on the Front Lines of This Discussion

The difficulties that German patients have already faced in obtaining a drug that is now legal in their own country for medical use (and even for recreational purposes across an open border in Holland) are legion. While to a certain extent, German patients are in the same boat as patients elsewhere and their problems, in fact, there are still huge access issues that remain. For starters, the drug is much more expensive here, so those without health insurance approval face bills of about $3,000 per month. Why the eye-watering price? All medical grade cannabis is still imported, although increasingly this is now just via other EU countries, not just from Canada.

“One of the reasons we organized the national German Patient Roundtable is to give patients a voice in all of this supply and demand discussion and to help BfArM and others formulate workable solutions for all,” responded Philip Cenedella IV when reached for a response by CIJ. Cenedella, an American expat and the organizer of the Roundtable, a nationally focussed, umbrella group that is kicking off its campaign this year, spoke for many who are far from court and boardrooms where the decisions are being made.

Philip Cenedella
Philip Cenedella, pictured left, at the Deutsche Hanfverband (DHV) conference in Berlin last November.
Photo: @MedPayRx, Instagram

“While there are very talented firms who will now take up this discussion with the government and reissue a response for the tender, what we continue to see on the ground is that patients simply do not have the access granted them in the law which was passed over a year ago,” Cenedella says, with more than a note of frustration. “We again are calling on all government officials, industry executives and patient advocates to band together to immediately establish workable protocols that directly help the patients.”

Indeed, despite the frustration and delay, if not new costs and opportunities that this decision creates, one thing is very clear on the ground here. The current status quo is unacceptable. That alone should also put pressure on the powers that be to remedy the situation as quickly as possible. And via several routes, including widening import quotas or even issuing new licenses as a new solution to domestic cultivation is implemented.

“Patients are not being served and do not have access to a medicine that has been proven to improve lives,” says Cenedella. “Our simple request is for BfArM to finally invite patients into their discussions, to work with patients to formulate workable cultivation and distribution solutions, and we humbly request that this happen now before they go down another dead-end road, ending in another court defeat, and resulting in even more delays to the patients that are still lacking the care afforded them by the German Federal Court’s decision of 2017.”

 

For more info:

http://www.germanpatientroundtable.de

 


US – German Cannabis Producers Can’t Do Business Together, Here’s Why – by Michael Knodt @ marijuana.com

US, German Cannabis Producers Can’t Do Business Together, Here’s Why


BY MICHAEL KNODT ON

Bureaucratic hurdles and an unexpectedly high demand for medical cannabis in Germany have created a bottleneck that’s plagued cannabis patients and producers alike. It would seem as though working with the United States could alleviate some of the pressure, but the federal government in Germany has avoided working with the country’s producers for fear of violating the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs.

Until Germany can develop a robust cannabis cultivation industry, its patients will continue to receive their medicine sporadically from Canada or the Netherlands. While 18 varieties of cannabis are supposed to be available, patients are lucky to find four strains at their local pharmacy — a significant issue when German doctors are required to prescribe a specific strain for patients. If that strain’s not available, the prescription is worthless.

Once the Israeli government has defined their guidelines for cannabis export, their medical cannabis will find its way into German pharmacies to help alleviate the recent bottlenecks. Israel is expected to develop a cannabis export system in the next couple of years.

Cannabis farmers in the U.S. West Coast, Nevada, Colorado, and Alaska might welcome the opportunity to expand into international markets, and patients in Germany could benefit from the new, highly effective selection of U.S. cannabis strains. But the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs labels cannabis on par with cocaine and opium — therein lies the problem for Germany doing business with U.S. cannabis producers.

The Single Convention on Narcotics and Drugs of 1961 is still the foundation of worldwide drug legislation. It includes the coca, opium poppy, cannabis, the opium plant’s raw materials, opiates, heroin, and some synthetic opioids such as methadone. The Convention on Psychotropic Substances of Feb. 21, 1971 extended the list of controlled substances to include psychotropic substances such as amphetamines, barbiturates, and LSD and came into force on Aug. 16, 1976.

Only the medical use of narcotics for pain relief is excluded from the Convention but has to be enacted in compliance with the measures deemed necessary by the United Nations (UN). Member nations must report their produced, exported, stored, and used narcotics to the Narcotic Control Council.

A State Must Purchase All Medical Cannabis Crops

Article 23 of the Single Convention states:

A Party that permits the cultivation of the opium poppy for the production of opium shall establish, if it has not already done so, and maintain, one or more government agencies (hereafter in this article referred to as the Agency) to carry out the functions required under this article.

Article 23 (2) (d) says: “All cultivators of the opium poppy shall be required to deliver their total crops of opium to the Agency. As soon as possible, but not later than four months after the end of the harvest.”

According to Articles 26 and 28 of the Single Convention, the same control system applies to coca and cannabis. Health Canada is in violation of Article 23, paragraph 2d for allowing producers to sell directly to patients. Unlike the Office of Medical Cannabis (OMC) in the Netherlands, the Canadian agency does not purchase and sell the licensed producers’ crops.

The establishment of such an agency is independent of whether government institutions or licensed private providers take over the cultivation. Such agencies only exist in the few states where opium, coca, and cannabis are grown legally: The Turkish Grain Board (for Opium in Turkey), Health Canada’s Office of Controlled Substances, the National Institute on Drug Abuse in the U.S., the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) in Germany, the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety, the Office of Medicinal Cannabis in the Netherlands, the Czech State Agency for Medical Cannabis, and the Medical Cannabis Unit in Israel.

The U.S. government would have to recognize the medical benefits of cannabis and remove the drug from Schedule 1 of the narcotics act before the NIDA could offer medical cannabis for export to the German BfArM.

Ways Around the Single Convention

It is almost impossible for a member of the United Nations to legalize cannabis without coming into conflict with the international community. Uruguay, Bolivia, and Canada have already had to deal with the issue and have each taken different approaches to reconciling new national policy with existing international agreements.

Out and Back In

In 2009, the Bolivian government proposed deleting some provisions regarding the coca leaf, but the proposal was rejected by the other member nations. On June 29, 2011, Bolivia withdrew from the Single Convention through Jan. 1, 2012 and rejoined with an objection to Article 50 on Jan. 10, 2012.

Bolivia stated that it would allow the cultivation, trade, and consumption of coca leaves in its country. Within one year, 15 contracting nations filed an objection, well short of the one-third quorum required to reject Bolivia’s objection. Bolivia was reclassified as a contracting party on Jan. 11, 2013.

Ignore the Issue

Uruguay was reprimanded shortly before the legalization of cannabis by the UN Drug Administration’s International Narcotic Control Board (INCB). The former INCB-president Raymond Yans accused Uruguay’s then-president Jose Mujica of having an “attitude of a pirate” because his government legalized cannabis. Mujica fiercely resisted the allegations repeatedly made against his country and publicly responded to the criticism of the former INCB chairman:

“Tell the old man to stop lying. We can meet whenever he wants in Uruguay. […]. He sits in a comfortable position on the International stage and believes he can tell nonsense.”

Despite the dramatic exchanges, the international community has not sanctioned Uruguay for being the first country in the world to legalize cannabis. Incidentally, a similar complaint was addressed to the United States after the legalization ballots in Colorado and Washington State. In November 2012, Yans stated the legalization of the cultivation and possession of cannabis in Colorado and Washington violated the treaty and asked the U.S. government to restore conformity with the single convention.

Recreational cannabis is legal in eight states and the District of Columbia, and the international community is far from sanctioning the U.S. However, ignoring the treaty also means missing out on access to the international market and the opportunity to take part in international research efforts.

Don’t Comply, Justify

At the 59th meeting of the United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs in March 2016, Undersecretary for Health of Canada Hilary Geller expressed Canada’s interest in international cooperation and made it clear, “the Government remains committed to strong international cooperation to combat the world drug problem and wherever possible, will seek to align its objectives for a new marijuana regime with the objectives of the international drug control framework and the spirit of the Conventions.”

Canada is the first to take the position of “non-compliance.” With Geller’s announcement, Canada has laid the foundation for an ongoing debate on how to regulate cannabis at the national level without violating international legal obligations.

Change

Even if the 1961 Single Convention could be amended, that would involve a complex, years-long process.

Canada could set a precedent in July 2018, by forcing the U.N. to rethink the position of cannabis for the first time since 1961. The aim of the process would be to give all member nations the opportunity to regulate recreational and medical cannabis in the future. Legislation in international agreements is never set in stone, it can be changed any time the democratic will of the member nations demands it.
ABOUT AUTHOR
Michael Knodt is an expert on cannabis politics and cannabis culture across Europe. Born in North Germany, Michael has been living in Berlin since 1990. He initially studied history and journalism before receiving his certification as a carpenter. Since then, Michael has made regular visits to countries where cannabis is cultivated, such as Jamaica and Morocco. He has worked as a freelancer for Weedmaps, Vice Magazine Germany, Sensi Seeds and numerous German-language cannabis magazines since 2004. From 2005 to 2013, Michael was the Editor-in-Chief of Germanys biggest cannabis periodical. He also is the face and presenter of the most popular program on cannabis prohibition and just launched a new channel called “DerMicha.” Aside from his journalistic work, Michael is a cannabis patient, activist, sought-after speaker on conferences and congresses, and a father of two.


Regulation in Germany….and we aren’t talking about soccer :)

The current regulation in Germany made it difficult for German companies to apply to get a license for Cannabis cultivation.

** And that is why the process is now held up in litigation in the German court system. One of the unsuccessful bidders has sued over the requirements and the entire application process is on hold, with any potential awards being made in Q1 or Q2 2018 at the earliest.

What is the most popular model for cannabis cultivation in Germany, so far?
The cultivation in Germany is currently not legal, done outdoors and indoors and hidden from sight and smell as best as possible.

There is no legal German cultivation currently allowed, even for patients with valid medical approvals.

There is small cultivation being done as part of R+D projects in Universities and Scientific companies.

Regarding joint ventures: How do foreign cannabis companies usually work together with German companies?

In various ways, based on their business objectives and strategy. Three examples are:

Canopy Growth Corporation purchased a German firm Medcann, which became Spektrum Germany. They are considered by many to be the premier cannabis firm in Germany today.

Maricann of Canada purchased a former cargo facility in Dresden for 3€ million and is ramping up their European operations, adding staff, and building out their new European headquarters.

An international firm is currently in discussions with a German startup, to establish a joint venture partnership which will make news around the world. This partnership should be made public in early 2018 and will be ground-breaking.

To cover the demand of medical cannabis Germany is importing from other countries. Supply is coming especially from Canada. Which other countries might be relevant cannabis suppliers in the future?

Canada and The Netherlands are currently the only authorized countries to import into Germany. Supplies are seriously constrained and with Canada becoming a legal recreational country in July 2018, the supply bottlenecks are expected to be exacerbated well into 2019.

Tilray has announced plans to establish a cultivation facility in Portugal to supply the German, and European market in the future.

The governments of Greece, Israel, South Africa, Australia, Chile, Uruguay, and others are currently working with private sector companies to establish their own cultivation and export capabilities.

Germany, with twice the population of California, is a key market for any serious player in the global cannabis industry.

What is your personal opinion about the current German regulation. What will be the next major steps?

Regulation and taxation is always better than the illegality and violence of the black market. Always.

Thank God for the German court system which has brought legalized medical marijuana to the people, if it were up to the politicians, we would still be waiting.

Now the intelligent implementation of recreational laws need to be established to legalize the plant which has been used for thousands of years.

Reducing opioid deaths, helping certain people with their medical conditions, and enabling super-straight people to enjoy jazz music are just some of the benefits of a world where ganja is regulated, safe, and profitable.

The flower of cannabis will always have a place in the market, but in the next years we will see an increase in other forms of cannabis that are more easily consumed….edibles, oils, salves and the like. As a result, GMP (Good Manufacturing Process) certification is going to become very important for those wanting to establish a quality product in the German and European markets.

And if we look at the European Cannabis market. Which major market trends do you identify?

1- Everyone seems to be focusing on cultivation, but this segment is expected to become a commodity item in the near term. Companies may want to look at establishing a product line including “finished products with GMP certification” to become a leading force in this market.

2- At some point the insurance companies are going to become true partners in providing cannabis therapies to the German pharmacies. This will happen as a result of cost-savings and health-benefits realized vs. the current pharmaceuticals offered to patients.

3- In the words of Peter Tosh:
“Legalize it.”

The Berlin Peace Accords (attached) calls for an end to the 80 year World War On Cannabis, and we agree. Legal, regulated, safe and non-violent recreational marijuana markets have already been established in the US and Uruguay, with Canada and others joining the party in 2018.

Pharmaceutical companies don’t like it, Beer companies don’t like it (although the owners of Corona beer just invested $250 million in Canopy Growth’s cannabis business last month) and some short-sighted politicians don’t like it. But “We the People…” have made our opinions known and the calls for a rational, legal, safe and non-violent cannabis market is just a few moments away here in the center of Europe.

These are historic times, Germany is leading the world in many ways, 2018 will be an interesting year.

peace,
Phil


WOW – Canopy Growth, Organa Brands and Green House Seeds Joint Venture announced!

http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/new-collaboration-joins-three-of-the-worlds-most-influential-cannabis-businesses-658196733.html

SMITHS FALLS, ON, DENVER and AMSTERDAM, Nov. 17, 2017 /CNW/ – Green House Holdings North America Inc. (“Green House”), its affiliate in the Netherlands, GHSC Trading B.V., National Concessions Group Inc. (“Organa Brands”) and Canopy Growth Corporation (“Canopy Growth” or “the Company”) (TSX: WEED), together three of the most storied and successful global cannabis businesses are pleased to announce the planned creation of a collaborative joint venture (the “JV”).

To establish the JV, Canopy Growth will allocate a portion of ownership in ACMPR-licensed Agripharm Corp. (“Agripharm”), a 20,000 sq. ft. indoor growing facility located in Creemore, Ontario, to its new partners. Canopy Growth will retain 40% ownership of Agripharm, while Green House and Organa Brands will own 40% and 20%, respectively, of Agripharm. In exchange for the issuance of shares, Green House and Organa Brands have granted an exclusive, royalty-free licence in Canada to certain proprietary technology, trademarks, genetics, know-how and other intellectual property to Agripharm, subject to compliance with applicable law.

The JV will create a new Canadian home-base for Green House and Organa Brands where they will work together with Canopy Growth to produce cannabis products for the Canadian market. Pursuant to the JV, the Company has the right to purchase all of the cannabis products produced by Agripharm to be exclusively distributed via Canopy Growth’s national channels, subject to limited exceptions. In addition, the Company will sublicense the proprietary technology, trademarks, genetics, know-how and other intellectual property from Agripharm in order to ensure that Canopy Growth is able to satisfy consumer demand across Canada for the suite of Green House and Organa Brands products.

Although Agripharm is focused on the Canadian market, Canopy Growth, Green House, Organa Brands and their respective affiliates will also explore other federally-legal international opportunities as they arise, including with respect to medical research and development opportunities, product distribution platforms, and brick-and-mortar retail locations. Agripharm will not conduct any business in the United States.

“Our business has separated itself from the competition by focusing on brands and products that resonate with people but also because we’ve found creative ways to collaborate with like-minded businesses to increase the breadth of our product offering,” said Mark Zekulin, President, Canopy Growth. “From world-class breeders like our partners DNA Genetics and now Green House Seeds, to sector innovators like Organa Brands, to cultural icons like Snoop Dogg, we work with the best in order to bring the best possible cannabis forward to our customers.”

The JV is expected to close on or about December 1, 2017. Operationally, Canopy Growth will transfer oversight to its new collaborators who will operate a pristine licensed facility with modular growing rooms designed to produce only the very best cannabis flowers. Green House will oversee day-to-day operations and bring their own expertise into cultivation, while Organa will implement world-class extraction functions as new and novel value-add products become part of the regulatory environment. Canopy Rivers Corporation, a partly-owned subsidiary of Canopy Growth, has also entered into an agreement to provide the JV with up to $20 million in funding for the expansion of the facility in exchange for ongoing royalty payments and a warrant to acquire up to 4% of the issued and outstanding common shares.

“For 30 years Green House Brands has been at the forefront of cannabis legalization by advocating for its normalization and expansion into new territories,” said Arjan Roskam, the founder of Green House Brands. “We’re now operating in four continents (Europe, Africa, South America and North America) and thanks to this new partnership with these two prominent market leaders in the industry, Canopy and Organa Brands, we will create even more opportunities globally to help the world access cannabis in a legal way. This epic move will allow us to maintain our position as a world leader in genetics and cannabis retail, while alerting the cannabis consumer that we will continue striving to make cannabis available worldwide for all medicinal and recreational consumers one day.”

Canopy Growth, Green House, and Organa Brands each bring a unique set of skills that are strategically complementary to one another. Canopy Growth has built an online distribution platform that touches every province and territory in Canada as well as 7 international markets; Green House is a genetic leader that has bred some of the world’s most sought-after strains; and Organa Brands is an extract product innovator. Together, the JV is positioned to take sought after genetics, insert those genetics into consumer-friendly ingestion formats, and put them on stores shelves across the country, and abroad.

“We are incredibly excited about this new partnership – since the inception of Organa Brands, one of the key tenets of our business has been forming smart partnerships with mutually beneficial results. Working with Canopy and Green House has been a surreal moment as we continue to fully recognize the impact of what this deal means for the industry as a whole” said Organa Brands Co-Founder, Jeremy Heidl. “We couldn’t have asked for better partners in Canada and beyond- this new global partnership will prove to be a defining moment for all parties involved.”

Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP acted as legal counsel to Canopy Growth with respect to the JV, Dentons Canada LLP acted as legal counsel to Green House, and Stikeman Elliott LLP acted as legal counsel to Organa Brands.

For more information on this new partnership click here.

Here’s to Future Growth.

About Canopy Growth Corporation
Canopy Growth is a world-leading diversified cannabis company, offering distinct brands and curated cannabis varieties in dried, oil and capsule forms. Through its wholly‑owned subsidiaries, Canopy Growth operates numerous state-of-the-art production facilities with over half a million square feet of GMP-certified indoor and greenhouse production capacity, all to an unparalleled level of quality assurance procedures and testing. Canopy Growth has established partnerships with leading sector names in Canada and abroad, with interests and operations spanning four continents. The Company is proudly dedicated to educating healthcare practitioners, providing consistent access to high quality cannabis products, conducting robust clinical research, and furthering the public’s understanding of cannabis. For more information visit http://www.canopygrowth.com

About Green House Holdings North America Inc.
Green House Brands is bringing the most awarded and recognized cannabis brand in the world to the North American market. Established in 1985 in Amsterdam, the Green House Brands portfolio includes five leading marijuana businesses – Strain Hunters, Green House Seed Co., Green House Feeding, Green House Coffee shops & King of Cannabis — as seen on VICE & National Geographic. Green House assets have won the company numerous accolades, including over 40 High Times Cannabis Cups and 200+ awards for top genetics, establishing the company’s leadership in the global cannabis industry. Green House was a pioneer in the development of the European cannabis coffee shop market, where its Green House Coffee shops in the Netherlands and Strain Hunters Clubs in Spain remain market leaders. As Strain Hunters, the company has been featured in documentary series on HBO and VICE, highlighting its globetrotting journeys to find the rarest landrace strains of cannabis. Green House and Strain Hunters media has over 150M views and has one of the most powerful marketing platforms in the industry. Green House enters the rapidly developing legal North American cannabis markets with all of its enterprises. For more information please visit http://www.greenhousebrands.com

About Organa Brands
Organa Brands revolutionized the cannabis industry with the introduction of supercritical CO₂extracted cannabis oil in 2010 and the introduction of the groundbreaking O.penVAPE device in 2012. Today, the company is home to the world’s largest consumer cannabis brands. After developing O.penVAPE, Bakked, and Organa Labs into world-class brands with nationwide distribution, the company acquired The Magic Buzz, and entered into a joint venture to form District Edibles. Organa Brands sells one of its products every 4 seconds around the world, and has delivered over one billion puffs through its flagship O.penVAPE line. A brand incubator and pioneer in the cannabis space, Organa Brands utilizes its 12 production facilities in 11 states and Jamaica to manufacture its extensive catalog of products. Organa Brands sells its cannabis products in over 1,200 retail locations with ancillary hardware sold in thousands of retailers globally– making it the largest cannabis-oil-based consumer products company in the United States. Agripharm– a joint venture between Organa Brands, Canopy Growth Corporation (TSX: WEED), and the world-renowned Greenhouse Seed Company– ushers in a new era of international distribution for the three brand powerhouses. Organa Brands is committed to dominating the global cannabis market through the marriage of science and technology, all for the benefit of the consumer. For more information, please visit http://www.OrganaBrands.com