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Peter Homberg is Partner and Head of the German Life Sciences Practice at Dentons, one of the top 10 global law firms present in more than 50 countries. He and his colleagues advise on Germany’s new regulations regarding the legalization of cannabis for medical use.

There are many unusual questions to be asked, so this time we caught up with a very different kind of expert: Peter Homberg is Partner and Head of the German Life Sciences Practice at Dentons, one of the top 10 global law firms present in more than 50 countries. He and his colleagues advise on Germany’s new regulations regarding the legalization of cannabis for medical use.

Peter, the effect and use of cannabis are highly controversial. What is the significance of cannabis for medical purposes and what does the legalization mean for patients?

Before the law was liberalized, patients who suffered from certain diseases, like multiple sclerosis, cancer or chronic pain, could only use cannabis if they had applied for a specific exemption at the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM). As regulations were extremely strict, only a few hundred patients were granted the permission to use the cannabis plant for medicinal purposes.

So what does it do? The plant is famous for containing THC, short for tetrahydrocannabinol, which binds to specific cannabis receptors (CB) in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The activation of CB1 in the spinal cord, for instance, reduces the perception of pain. In terms of medical use this means that cannabis can give relief to people suffering from cancer, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain and other serious diseases

The change in law means that patients can now receive a prescription from their doctor. If the doctor decides that there are no therapeutic alternatives to alleviate the patient’s suffering, the prescription allows the patient to obtain cannabis at the pharmacy. Although the restrictions have been lifted slightly, these processes are still strictly controlled by the BfArM.

The change in German law means that cannabis can now be prescribed as a pain killer by GPs
What is the current state of affairs in regards to legislation and what is the legal process for obtaining a license to cultivate cannabis?

With the legalization of cannabis, the BfArM established a cannabis agency within the institution to organize and control the cultivation of cannabis for medical use. As a result, a public tender has been released, and numerous companies have applied for the cultivation license.

Companies have to abide to strict guidelines to obtain a cultivation license
Of course, the process is taking much longer than expected, as this is a totally new field and the BfArM is asking for very specific qualifications: A company needs to have had some kind of past experience with cannabis products, they have to own indoor premises for the cultivation of the plants and have specific security measures in place in order to qualify.

Although we don’t have companies in Germany that have experience with growing cannabis, we do have some that have imported the plants from outside of Germany. They have significant experience in handling the product, be it through packaging or security measures.

For example, here in Germany there is a subsidiary of a larger Canadian company that has been producing the plants to a large extent. So this is a great advantage for them as they can build on their experience in Canada and fulfil the necessary requirements to qualify as legal cultivators.

You’ve been able to legally smoke weed in the Netherlands since the 1970’s, other countries like Italy and Denmark liberalized the medical use years ago. Germany seems quite slow in catching-up, why is that?

The legalization of cannabis for medical use in Germany occurred through a chain of unforeseeable events
Germany has one of the strictest narcotic drugs laws in Europe. In my opinion, if the German Federal Administrative Court hadn’t made a very specific decision, then the changes in legislation would never have been made. But through a chain of unforeseeable events, the following occurred:

One of the patients who had received the exemption from the BfArM, started growing his own cannabis at home, stating that the exemption included not only the purchase, but also the cultivation of cannabis. When BfArM sent him a cease and desist order, he took the issue to court.

In the last instance, the court ruled in his favour. This meant that all people who had previously received an exemption from BfArM would be able to legally grow cannabis at home. As this ruling would have resulted in a loss of control by the BfArM and in extension the government, cannabis was legalized for medical use and the complete control over cultivation and distribution returned to the government.

What role is Dentons playing in this whole transition process?

First and foremost we have been informing our international clients on regulatory issues and the new legislation in Germany. With cannabis everything is new, it’s a completely new field and different from any other topic in the life sciences.

THC – tetrahydrocannabinol – binds to specific cannabis receptors in the central and peripheral nervous systems
We have an international cannabis group at Dentons that is at the forefront of current affairs and keeps up to date on the topic. Our work includes regulatory advice, mergers and acquisitions and intellectual property. For instance, we have advised clients, one of them a large Canadian company, on the acquisition of a cannabis distributor in Germany to get a strong foothold in the country and on the European market.

In future, we will also have to handle various disputes. It will be very interesting to see how they evolve, how to handle them and their outcome. If one company, for example, receives the permission to cultivate cannabis in Germany and others don’t, then these decisions will certainly be challenged.

What can Germany… what can Europe learn from Canada?

Canada is well ahead in the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes. What is happening in Germany now is following the Canadian pattern: Today, we have a tender in the public procurement field that came from BfArM. It invited qualified companies to put forward their bid on specific cannabis plants in order to sell these to BfArM. In turn, BfArM will sell these plants to the pharmacies. Like in Canada, a government controlled process.

Germany can learn from Canada in issues of quality control as well. BfArM wants to overlook the cultivation and distribution process, because patients have to be able to count on a high quality product. Quality control includes specific laboratories, which check the type of insecticides or pesticides used or how much THC a plant contains.

There is much to learn from the Canadians, such as quality control, and cultivation and distribution processes
How do you see this niche developing from a legal but also from a medical perspective? What do you personally hope to see happen?

Our clients hope to see a greater liberalization, also for casual use. In my opinion this is not going to happen neither in Germany, nor in other countries in Europe. Nevertheless, more countries in the world are considering the medical use of cannabis and consequently, investors are looking into it as they expect a significant growth in the market.

We will also see a certain amount of effort put into research. With this new kind of liberalisation the indications that qualify for cannabinoid treatment have to be defined. Today we know that cannabis can help patients with for example chronic pain, cancer or multiple sclerosis, but in future we may discover more indications that will qualify for the treatment with cannabis.

“Germany has one of the strictest narcotic drugs laws in Europe”
Accordingly, the group of patients who can use cannabis as a medicinal product will grow. But the market in Germany is very competitive, so it will be interesting to see how companies and institutions will position themselves on the market to get a piece of the cake that is bound to become larger and larger every year.

Personally, I am glad that cannabis has been made available as a medicinal product for people who suffer severe pain. For many it is the best painkiller with less side effects than other drugs.

Want to learn more about the legal aspects of cannabis as a medicinal product? Visit Dentons here!

Images via Miss Nuchwara Tongrit, Africa Studio, Shutterstockphoto3, Zerbor/Shutterstock

What you need to Know about the Legalization of Cannabis for Medical Use

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Volatility In Cannabis Land (Germany) – How will it affect prices for consumers? – by Marguerite Arnold

The debate about the price of cannabis as well as its imminent “collapse” or price hikes has been around since there has been a legal market.
In general, the conventional wisdom is a bit off the mark. For the most part, even when it is accurate, it is highly regional and at best temporal, subject to uncertain if short-lived winds. Why? Every cannabis market these days is a different animal thanks to regulations. Further, the American state focussed industry is very different from any other country right now. Canada, Germany, Israel and Australia are more alike to each other than any similarities they share with the U.S. state industry. In any state.

Then there are new wrinkles that so far have not been priced into any of these predictions. If anything, the price of cannabis is going to increase, dramatically, globally over the next 18 months.

U.S. State Markets Are Different
There is a body of evidence that shows that the price of cannabis, to the consumer, has dramatically fallen in places like Colorado. This is understandable for very easy to grasp economic concepts. Supply and demand. The market in Colorado has normalized. There is risk, but there is less of it and all of it is in-state. This all goes into cannabis pricing that is absolutely felt by the consumer. Not to mention all the way along the line until it gets to retail. There is also evidence that the California state cannabis market is going through a similar transition, along with Washington State.

In turn, this along with other pressures are pushing growers to cut costs. But those pressures include major issues, like water, land and energy conservation. None of the investment in such initiatives is tax deductible, either. In other words, this is a rich man’s game of high equity and razor thin margins that those who are well capitalized enough are now playing. Everyone else is being marginalized.

Further, the temporary ups and downs of state markets in the U.S. is by definition, limited to those state markets. It is illegal to transport anything cannabinoid over state lines. And while CBD may be the first to fall on this front, for now, what happens in Boulder, stays in Colorado.

Canadian Markets Will Be Stressed Next Year
There is ample evidence already, just based on the domestic situation in Canada, that there well might be a global medical marijuana shortage until 2020. This has a great to do with how the international as well as domestic Canadian markets are shaping up.

Right now, domestic licensed producers in Canada are expanding. They have great access to global equity markets. They are entering foreign territories. Plus they have large stockpiles of cannabis. The medical patient population is also growing at about 10% a month. In other words, it could double right at the time recreational takes off.

And there is already a rec market in Canada that is easily large enough to compete with even domestic patients.

On top of that, the entire German medical market could be sourced from Canada for the next 18 months to two years. Patient populations, even as estimated by the government (and they are conservative) will put a significant dent in Canadian supplies also.

Even though two new developments may in fact serve to help alleviate the supply of medical grade cannabis, that is already a huge demand that well may drive prices up even if over “just” the next two years.

And while Australia and Israel have just jumped into the cannabis export game, the former via its apparent intent to source most domestic cannabis from Tasmania, this is unlikely to have much of an effect. Yes, Tasmania supplies 40% of the world’s legal heroin. Medical cannabis, however, is a fish of an entirely different flavour.

There is zero chance that any national government at this point, will source the majority of their medical crops or even medication from down under. It is just too expensive. Importing cannabis into Australia (primarily from Canada) also just got very controversial.

For that very reason, all the pricing indicators and market pressures point to at minimum, ongoing upward price trends on the raw plant from growers all the way through to consumers.

German Patients Are In Trouble
If there is one place in the legalizing world right now where price has gone through the roof, it is Germany right now. In an effort to kill the home grow market, the German government passed a new law at the beginning of the year. It will be revolutionary, once they get the kinks out. For now, however, insurers are having to be widely sued to begin covering the drug. Doctors are reluctant to prescribe it. And patients are facing uncompensated costs at pharmacies that have risen dramatically even this year for reasons that have nothing to do with production or distribution, but a locally imposed “pharmacists processing fee.” A month’s supply to a German patient right now, is around $2,400.

It is the German situation, in fact, which dramatically underscores all of the discussions about price volatility and supply.The legal cannabis world is under licensed and way too small to even meet existing demand.

State markets in the U.S. are their own animal for right now. Outside of this very differently refracted local lens, however, the cannabis commodity market has a global footprint that is fairly easy to track, predict and understand when seen from this perspective.

[Featured image credit: commons.wikimedia.org]

Marguerite Arnold | September 11, 2017 at 5:29 am | Tags: Cannabis, cannabis prices, consumer cannabis proce, German cannabis, Israel cannabis, Medical Cannabis | Categories: Business, Opinion, Regulations | URL: http://wp.me/p8nEcz-Mg


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German Medical Marijuana patients continued suffering despite the new law – from Hemp Magazine

After a small request from the federal government that the health insurance funds have to approve a therapy with medical cannabis before the statutory health insurance takes over the costs for the treatment, Frank Tempel, a sign of the drug policy of the left fraction, gives answers Questions that could be asked by those concerned. Meanwhile, the draft of a cannabis control law of the Green Bundestag fraction of March 2015 was rejected.
As beautiful as the new “Act on the Amendment to Narcotic Drugs and Other Provisions”, which came into effect on March 10, 2017, it raises a few dark shadows that could have a negative impact on the patient in the future. One of the central problems is the cost of a cannabis therapy by statutory health insurance. While pain patients receive the treatment in most cases, the world looks quite different in mental disorders, for example cases of ADHD or depression, Tempel reports on his website.
Requests for reimbursement would often be rejected in these patients. This also applies to patients who had already received a special permit from cannabis therapy from the “Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices” prior to the entry into force of the Act. Because of this, it was already the first complaints of patients against the health insurance companies, it goes on. Temple also drew attention to the fact that there are some tips and hints to be able to claim the right to the costs.
The right to therapy with cannabis may be to patients if “a generally accepted medical standard” is either “not available” or “can not be used”, as well as “a not distant prospect perceptible positive effect on the course of the disease or on serious symptoms, “the Federal Government said in response to the small request from the left. According to the government, the treating physician must confirm these criteria and justify his decision against the health insurance company. But what helps if the cash registers?
Support the doctor
Tempel points out that it is easy for health insurance funds, especially through the second criterion, to refuse an application for the costs. This would be due to the lack of studies on the use of cannabis as a medicine, explains the deputy chairman of the Committee on Internal Medicine of the Bundestag. The 48-year-old, therefore, recommends “to refer to the introduction of a companion for which the patients have to participate if the costs of the therapy are to be reimbursed.”
In addition, he advises the physicians to assist in the completion of the application, since the health insurance companies would reject it at the smallest form defect. A sample application that could make life easier for the doctors offers the “Arbeitsgemeinschaft Cannabis as medicine” on their website http://www.cannabis-med.org . In order to take the perhaps still inexperienced doctor in this area further, the politician recommends in a discussion with the doctor also, professional-medically-based information to these to pass.
Where can I find a suitable doctor?
But already the search for a supervising doctor prepares the patient difficulties. The doctors would have little desire for more of the unpaid work and the effort they have to do, so temples. This is understandable. In addition to disputes with the health insurance companies, the treating physician must collect information about his patient and then pass it on to the “Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices”. Temple once again refers to the “Cannabis as a medical community”, which can be asked for a doctor from the region who already has experience in prescribing medicinal hemp.
What to do if the cash office refuses?
If the applications, which are usually processed by the health insurance company within three weeks, but which can be withdrawn at the time the medical service is examined for examination of the application for five weeks, Tempel recommends that the supervisory authority, the relevant cash register. A protest may also be filed against the decision. A generator can also be found on the website of the “Arbeitsgemeinschaft Cannabis als Medizin”.
By a contradiction, the patient can also provide additional time, so that further advice can be brought into the boat, informs Tempel and writes to the following: “Do you have only courage to protest against the refusal of the health insurance company. There are cases in which the health insurance funds have approved it after the objection and a new application for reimbursement. “As a last option, the politician is considering taking legal action before the Social Court. The “Cannabis Consortium for Medicine” is even considering the support of the patient in court cases, provided that good prospects for success would exist, Tempel continues.
The Greens fail with a bill
Even though Germany has taken a clear step in the handling of marijuana through the “Act for the Amendment of Narcotic Drugs and Other Provisions” in the recent past, there are, of course, still sets-up parameters that can be worked on. The Greens tried their luck already two years ago in March 2015.
At that time, the Bundestag’s party draft a cannabis control law and presented it to the health committee of the Bundestag, which was voted on Wednesday. Although the Greens had the left fraction on their side, they failed with their draft, however, to the factions of the Union and the SPD, who opposed it.
The Greens drew attention to the fact that the cannabis control law had been an alternative to the prohibiting policy which had taken place here because it was “completely failed.” In the case of marijuana, which is the most widely used illegal drug in Germany, the criminal law provisions of the Narcotics Act should no longer apply , so the desire of the Greens. Instead, they pleaded in their template for a controlled, legal market with a regulated cannabis trading chain.
“The no from the Union and the SPD to our cannabis control law is a no to youth and consumer protection,” the “Ärtzeblatt” cites Greens Group spokeswoman Katja Dörner and the spokesman for drug and addiction policy, Harald Terpe. Cannabis is not harmless, the party made clear, precisely because of this, youth and consumer protection should not be left to the dealer.


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“My fellow conservatives should protect medical marijuana from the government” – U.S. CONGRESSMAN DANA ROHRABACHER

http://www.philly.com/philly/opinion/commentary/conservatives-medical-marijuana-veterans-ptsd-20170906.html?mc_cid=3df8db3886&mc_eid=cd290ff91e

by Dana Rohrabacher

Not long ago, a supporter of mine visiting from California dropped by my Capitol office. A retired military officer and staunch conservative, he and I spent much of our conversation discussing the Republican agenda.

Finally, I drew a breath and asked him about an issue I feared might divide us: the liberalization of our marijuana laws, specifically medical marijuana reform, on which for years I had been leading the charge. What did he think about that controversial position?

“Dana,” he replied, “there are some things about me you don’t know.” He told me about his three sons, all of whom enlisted after 9/11.

Two of his sons returned from the battlefield whole and healthy. The third, however, came home suffering multiple seizures each day. His prospects were bleak.

His medical care fell under the total guidance of the Department of Veterans Affairs, whose doctors came under federal restraints regarding the treatments they could prescribe. (Among the treatments allowed were opioids.) Nothing worked.

Finally, a sympathetic doctor advised our young hero to see him in his private office, where he could prescribe medication derived from cannabis. The prescription worked. The seizures, for the most part, ceased.

“Dana,” said my friend, “I could hug you right now for what you’ve been doing, unknowingly, for my son.”

What had I been doing? With my Democratic friend Sam Farr, the now-retired California congressman, I wrote an amendment to spending bills that prohibits the federal government from prosecuting medical marijuana cases in states where voters have legalized such treatment. The amendment passed two consecutive years, the second time with a wider margin than the first, and has been extended through continuing resolutions and an omnibus spending bill.

Surprisingly, given the Obama administration’s generally liberal approach to marijuana, its Justice Department tried to interpret the amendment in such a convoluted way as to allow counterproductive raids on marijuana dispensaries. The courts — most recently the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit — repeatedly ruled that our amendment meant exactly what it said.

Unfortunately, my longtime friend Jeff Sessions, the attorney general, has urged Congress to drop the amendment, now co-sponsored by Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D., Ore.). This despite President Trump’s belief, made clear in his campaign and as president, that states alone should decide medical marijuana policies.

I should not need to remind our chief law enforcement officer or my fellow Republicans that our system of federalism, also known as states’ rights, was designed to resolve just such a fractious issue. Our party still bears a blemish for wielding the “states’ rights” cudgel against civil rights. If we bury state autonomy in order to deny patients an alternative to opioids, and ominously federalize our police, our hypocrisy will deserve the American people’s contempt.

More than half the states have liberalized medical marijuana laws, some even decriminalizing recreational use. Some 80 percent of Americans favor legalization of medical marijuana. Only a benighted or mean-spirited mind-set would want to block such progress.

Despite federal efforts to restrict supply, studies continue to yield promising results. And mounting anecdotal evidence shows again and again that medical marijuana can dramatically improve the lives of people with epilepsy, post-traumatic stress disorder, arthritis, and many other ailments.

Most Americans know this. The political class, not surprisingly, lags behind them.

Part of the reason is the failure of too many conservatives to apply “public choice economics” to the war on marijuana. Common sense, as well as public choice theory, holds that the government’s interest is to grow, just as private-sector players seek profit and build market share.

The drug-war apparatus will not give ground without a fight, even if it deprives Americans of medical alternatives and inadvertently creates more dependency on opioids. When its existence depends on asset seizures and other affronts to our Constitution, why should anti-medical-marijuana forces care if they’ve contributed inadvertently to a vast market, both legal and illegal, for opioids?

I invite my colleagues to visit a medical marijuana research facility and see for themselves why their cultural distaste might be misplaced. One exists near my district office at the University of California, Irvine, another at the University of California, San Diego.

Better yet, they might travel to Israel — that political guiding light for religious conservatives — and learn how our closest ally in the Middle East has positioned itself on the cutting edge of cannabis research. The Israeli government recently decriminalized first use, so unworried is it about what marijuana might do to its conscript military.

My colleagues should then return to Washington and keep my amendment intact, declaring themselves firmly on the side of medical progress. Failing that, the government will keep trying to eradicate the burgeoning marijuana business, thereby fueling and enriching drug cartels. Trust me: Hugs from grateful supporters are infinitely better.

Republican U.S. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher represents California’s 48th District. He wrote this for the Washington Post.


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Quotes

“We do not want individuals prosecuted—we want the industry to be accountable. This industry—starting from the top — should be systematically shut down.”

– Kevin Sabet, president of Smart Approaches to Marijuana, during a phone conference discussing the Cole Memo

“The President has told me he is a strong supporter of medicinal marijuana. He has launched a just war on opioids which he has correctly said is the real drug abuse crisis today.”

– Roger Stone, in a prepared statement in which he also apologizes for referring to a number of black Americans as “negro”

“If I hadn’t begun self-medicating with [cannabis], I would have killed myself. The relief isn’t immediate. It doesn’t make the pain disappear. But it’s the only thing that takes the sharpest edges off my symptoms…But I live in fear that I will be arrested purchasing an illegal drug. I want safe, regulated medical cannabis to be a treatment option.”

– Thomas James Brennan, a former sergeant in the Marine Corps who wrote an op-ed for the New York Times, “Make Pot Legal for Veterans With Traumatic Brain Injury“

“People who use medical marijuana to treat arthritis are literally burning joints to soothe their burning joints.”

– a “shower thought” from reddit user furiouspasta

“The dumbest purchase I ever made…hmm…dumbest purchase I ever made…I think it was when I bought what was supposed to be five dollars worth of pot in the village, way, way, way back, and the guy who got it for me got oregano. And I bought myself an envelope full of oregano.”

– David Crosby, founding member of both The Byrds and Crosby, Stills & Nash, during an impromptu call into The Best Show after “these pruciferous [which isn’t a word] people on Twitter” kept asking him to call in

[The idea of legalized recreational marijuana] “makes the hair stand up on the back of my neck.”

– US Attorney General Jeff Sessions addressing an audience at the National Alliance For Drug Endangered Children in Wisconsin


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Kiffen on recipe? The cannabis doctor of Berlin

– by Thorsten Harmsen

Eva Milz (44) treats patients with medical cannabis. It means that the possibilities of the medium have not been fully developed.

Legal killing on prescription – critics see the meaning of the law, which the Bundestag decided in March. For the first time, doctors can prescribe cannabis. One of them is Eva Milz, psychiatrist with practice in Johannisthal.

The flowers of the hemp plant can relieve severe symptoms of the disease: – chronic pain, spastic paralysis, nausea, anxiety. But the plant can do more. This is my medical profession, who has dedicated himself to the development of the therapeutic potential of cannabis. There are only a few in Germany who believe that it is worth using cannabis as a therapy attempt .

Eva Milz knows about the restraint of many colleagues when dealing with the medicine. Because physicians are only allowed to prescribe medicinal cannabis if standard therapies do not help or have a “not very distant prospect of noticeable positive development on the course of the disease”. “Most doctors talk out and think you have to wear your head under your arm before you get cannabis,” says Eva Milz. But the fear of the means is unfounded.

Cannabis has already been used as a medicine in antiquity, including China and Egypt. This experience has been lost, says Eva Milz. For example, no medicine student learns that the body has many docking points for the substances from the hemp plant. These would be used to control messengers which ensure the functioning of nerve cells. “That’s part of every textbook,” says Eva Milz.

Nationwide it was about a thousand patients

She worked in many clinics, most recently as a psychiatrist at the Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin. She knows the spectrum of the means of modern medicine. It was addressed to cannabis as a therapy option for the first time in 2002. She then worked in patient advice for the medicine portal of a specialist publishing house. Multiple sclerosis patients, to whom she was talking, had discovered by accident – for example, when smoking a joint – that cannabis helps them as no other remedy.

Many asked if it was not legal. In working for the Federal Center for Health Education, Eva Milz again met people who were suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and reported that they were permanently in a state of decline after cannabis withdrawal.

When she founded her practice in 2015, she co-operated with the doctor, Franjo Grotenhermen, chairman of the Cannabis Consortium for Medicine (ACM). Eva Milz reviewed medical reports from patients from all over Germany and sent them to the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices. At the time, this granted exemptions for patients who were allowed to use cannabis.

Nationwide, it was about a thousand – 20 percent of ADHD patients. Those affected can not concentrate, neither learn nor work. They often find themselves in an offside position because they have an outcrop. But after the consumption of cannabis, they were able to concentrate, were able to learn and work. Many got their impulses under control.

Cannabis plant
The flowers of the hemp plant can alleviate serious symptoms.
Photo: Imago / CTK Photo
In ADHD, the THC appears to promote the concentration and focus of patients

According to Eva Milz, this is due to the variety of the ingredients of the hemp plant, especially the cannabinoids. “The main player that most know is the THC,” she says, expelled tetrahydrocannabinol. It has a harsh, psychoactive effect. “Cannabidiol, CBD, is quite unknown,” says Eva Milz. It acts like an opponent to the THC: anxiety and cramping, relaxing and anti-inflammatory. In addition, there are other cannabinoids, essential oils and aromas.

The components worked together. In ADHD, for example, the THC appears to be mainly focussing on the concentration and focus of the patient, says Eva Milz. The CBD probably solve the fear. Because impulsiveness and austerity have much to do with fear.

Perplexed, the psychiatrist read in the doctor’s letters that it was always the parents of young ADHD patients who asked if one could not legalize cannabis. Those who were closest to those affected had noticed that conventional drugs such as Ritalin slowed the sufferers, but also slowed creativity and liveliness. Cannabis had been an alternative.

In multiple-sclerosis patients, the agent for pain and muscle cramps is also effective, because both parts – THC and CBD – are also present, says Eva Milz. A list of 14 varieties of medicinal cannabis blossoms with different dosages shows how diverse the remedy is.

“I have been waiting for the critical questions of cannabis opponents for two years”

Many people think of cannabis first drug, possible addiction and its consequences. But even these are well controlled by an experienced doctor, says Eva Milz. It is reminiscent of conventional drugs that trigger the most severe dependencies. Cannabis with its comparatively mild withdrawal symptoms could possibly serve as a substitute.

One missing Eva Milz: “I have been waiting for the critical questions of cannabis opponents for two years, but I do not get them.” Instead, desperate patients came to her, who had been thrown out by other doctors – as supposedly addicts who were on detours Material wanted to come.

The doctor is inter alia with researchers at a university in conversation. Studies are being conducted on the use of cannabis flowers in Tourette’s syndrome, ADHD and other diseases where the drug is already being used. “I would like to have 30 to 50 preparations, which I can use as necessary,” she says. It is used for inflammatory diseases, anxiety, sleep disorders, neurodermatitis, migraine and other ailments.

One problem is the cost. The health insurance funds approve only about half of the applications. But a treatment can cost up to 3000 euros a month. For one gram of cannabis, the pharmacies demand 22 euros. Many could not afford it.

– Quelle: http://www.berliner-kurier.de/28240224 ©2017