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Dr. Franjo Grotenhermen, on of the world’s preeminent medical cannabis experts, has announced a hunger strike until Germany sufficiently opens up the medical cannabis program to all patients in need. –

Source: Dr. Franjo Grotenhermen, on of the world’s preeminent medical cannabis experts, has announced a hunger strike until Germany sufficiently opens up the medical cannabis program to all patients in need. –

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Kiffen on recipe? The cannabis doctor of Berlin

– by Thorsten Harmsen

Eva Milz (44) treats patients with medical cannabis. It means that the possibilities of the medium have not been fully developed.

Legal killing on prescription – critics see the meaning of the law, which the Bundestag decided in March. For the first time, doctors can prescribe cannabis. One of them is Eva Milz, psychiatrist with practice in Johannisthal.

The flowers of the hemp plant can relieve severe symptoms of the disease: – chronic pain, spastic paralysis, nausea, anxiety. But the plant can do more. This is my medical profession, who has dedicated himself to the development of the therapeutic potential of cannabis. There are only a few in Germany who believe that it is worth using cannabis as a therapy attempt .

Eva Milz knows about the restraint of many colleagues when dealing with the medicine. Because physicians are only allowed to prescribe medicinal cannabis if standard therapies do not help or have a “not very distant prospect of noticeable positive development on the course of the disease”. “Most doctors talk out and think you have to wear your head under your arm before you get cannabis,” says Eva Milz. But the fear of the means is unfounded.

Cannabis has already been used as a medicine in antiquity, including China and Egypt. This experience has been lost, says Eva Milz. For example, no medicine student learns that the body has many docking points for the substances from the hemp plant. These would be used to control messengers which ensure the functioning of nerve cells. “That’s part of every textbook,” says Eva Milz.

Nationwide it was about a thousand patients

She worked in many clinics, most recently as a psychiatrist at the Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin. She knows the spectrum of the means of modern medicine. It was addressed to cannabis as a therapy option for the first time in 2002. She then worked in patient advice for the medicine portal of a specialist publishing house. Multiple sclerosis patients, to whom she was talking, had discovered by accident – for example, when smoking a joint – that cannabis helps them as no other remedy.

Many asked if it was not legal. In working for the Federal Center for Health Education, Eva Milz again met people who were suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and reported that they were permanently in a state of decline after cannabis withdrawal.

When she founded her practice in 2015, she co-operated with the doctor, Franjo Grotenhermen, chairman of the Cannabis Consortium for Medicine (ACM). Eva Milz reviewed medical reports from patients from all over Germany and sent them to the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices. At the time, this granted exemptions for patients who were allowed to use cannabis.

Nationwide, it was about a thousand – 20 percent of ADHD patients. Those affected can not concentrate, neither learn nor work. They often find themselves in an offside position because they have an outcrop. But after the consumption of cannabis, they were able to concentrate, were able to learn and work. Many got their impulses under control.

Cannabis plant
The flowers of the hemp plant can alleviate serious symptoms.
Photo: Imago / CTK Photo
In ADHD, the THC appears to promote the concentration and focus of patients

According to Eva Milz, this is due to the variety of the ingredients of the hemp plant, especially the cannabinoids. “The main player that most know is the THC,” she says, expelled tetrahydrocannabinol. It has a harsh, psychoactive effect. “Cannabidiol, CBD, is quite unknown,” says Eva Milz. It acts like an opponent to the THC: anxiety and cramping, relaxing and anti-inflammatory. In addition, there are other cannabinoids, essential oils and aromas.

The components worked together. In ADHD, for example, the THC appears to be mainly focussing on the concentration and focus of the patient, says Eva Milz. The CBD probably solve the fear. Because impulsiveness and austerity have much to do with fear.

Perplexed, the psychiatrist read in the doctor’s letters that it was always the parents of young ADHD patients who asked if one could not legalize cannabis. Those who were closest to those affected had noticed that conventional drugs such as Ritalin slowed the sufferers, but also slowed creativity and liveliness. Cannabis had been an alternative.

In multiple-sclerosis patients, the agent for pain and muscle cramps is also effective, because both parts – THC and CBD – are also present, says Eva Milz. A list of 14 varieties of medicinal cannabis blossoms with different dosages shows how diverse the remedy is.

“I have been waiting for the critical questions of cannabis opponents for two years”

Many people think of cannabis first drug, possible addiction and its consequences. But even these are well controlled by an experienced doctor, says Eva Milz. It is reminiscent of conventional drugs that trigger the most severe dependencies. Cannabis with its comparatively mild withdrawal symptoms could possibly serve as a substitute.

One missing Eva Milz: “I have been waiting for the critical questions of cannabis opponents for two years, but I do not get them.” Instead, desperate patients came to her, who had been thrown out by other doctors – as supposedly addicts who were on detours Material wanted to come.

The doctor is inter alia with researchers at a university in conversation. Studies are being conducted on the use of cannabis flowers in Tourette’s syndrome, ADHD and other diseases where the drug is already being used. “I would like to have 30 to 50 preparations, which I can use as necessary,” she says. It is used for inflammatory diseases, anxiety, sleep disorders, neurodermatitis, migraine and other ailments.

One problem is the cost. The health insurance funds approve only about half of the applications. But a treatment can cost up to 3000 euros a month. For one gram of cannabis, the pharmacies demand 22 euros. Many could not afford it.

– Quelle: http://www.berliner-kurier.de/28240224 ©2017


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Deutsche Bahn: Cannabis medicine at railway stations is permitted – from DHV

https://hanfverband.de/nachrichten/news/deutsche-bahn-cannabismedizin-auf-bahnhoefen-ist-erlaubt Published: 24 August 2017 – 11:08By: Florian Rister

Can cannabis patients take their medicine at stations? Are you allowed to smoke cannabis in designated smoking areas? These questions have not only been concerned with many affected and even railway workers since the amendment of the Act in March. The DHV has followed up at the German Railroad and received answers!

We are currently aware of a case in which a cannabis patient was given a ban on smoking in the smoking area of ​​a station due to the smoking of cannabis. It seemed all the more exciting to get an official statement from Deutsche Bahn. Because by the re-classification of medical cannabis as a classic Annex III narcotic, this actually corresponds to the same status as many other drugs also. It is therefore not surprising that the Deutsche Bahn provides in its opinion: Legal cannabis medicine prescribed and taken is permitted at railway stations, also smoked in the smoking zone!

Here are our related questions and the complete answers from DB:

1.) The building rules for DB stations prohibit “trade with and consumption of drugs and narcotics”. Does this apply in principle to prescribed anesthetics from Appendix III BtmG?

On the basis of the relevant legal bases, such as the BGB (German Civil Code) as well as other sources, the building rules for passenger stations reflect the conditions of use of all station visitors. The control content is based on the faulty behavior of station attendants perceived on the spot and are intended to ensure that all station visitors behave equally and in a manner which is reckless in DB’s railway stations. The regulation you referred to relates, as in the BtmG, to the anesthetics of Appendix III in principle. The exception to this is provided by medically prescribed anesthetics, which were prescribed by a physician according to the provisions of the BtmG §13 (1). In this case, we believe that the intended use, Which is detectable by the corresponding prescriptions. This means in practice, as long as pharmacies documented the entitlement to the funds from Annex III to prove and consumers according to the enclosed medical regulation the legal authority to the consumption of the anesthetics can prove and from consumption no danger for the life and / or the safety of the Railway undertakings, this is not prohibited by the rules of the DB railway stations.
2.) Can patients with a prescription for cannabis take this orally in railway stations or other premises of the DB, eg as a drop, drink or pastry?

Provided that the requirements of § 13 (1) are met and the consumer can prove this and does not create any danger to life or limb through the use, the consumption is permitted in public areas of the passenger stations. For non-public areas of DB or third parties in the station, eg travel centers, office complexes or even rental units in railway stations, the respective responsible owners can define different regulations at their own discretion. This is beyond the competence of DB Station & Service AG.
3.) Can patients with a prescription for cannabis smoke this in designated smoking areas on DB stations?

If the requirements of § 13 para. 1 are fulfilled and the consumer is able to prove this and the risk of death is not a risk to life and limb, the patient may smoke in the designated smoking areas of the DB Cannabis stations by means of smoking. Provided that he does so in a provocative manner or for other station visitors of an inconvenient form, we reserve the right to use the relevant safety authorities as the owner of the house. If a consumer is unable or can not prove his right to use against our employees or on behalf of the DB companies on demand, we reserve the right to initiate domestic measures and to contact the relevant safety authorities to clarify the facts.
Subjects:
German Hemp Association
Cannabis as medicine
Panorama & Strange
Germany – General information
Special Topics:
start page
Cannabis as medicine law (2016)


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Cannabis Shows Promise In Treating Schizophrenia And Tourette Syndrome

Cannabis Shows Promise In Treating Schizophrenia And Tourette Syndrome – by Janet Burns

Despite cannabis’ history in folk pharmacopoeias, clinical studies of its medicinal impact remain limited in many areas. Based on some promising early results, researchers are now calling for a closer look at its applications for certain mental health conditions for which more ‘traditional’ treatments have come up short.

According to recent studies, the cannabis-derived chemical cannabidiol (CBD) may offer meaningful relief with schizophrenia, a frequently chronic condition which can significantly interfere with how we think, feel, and behave.

At the University of Wollongong, researchers first discovered that CBD could provide new kinds of symptom relief for schizophrenic individuals by examining what science has uncovered about the chemical so far. To get a sense of CBD’s impact on cognitive function in relation to schizophrenia, Dr. Katrina Green, Professor Nadia Solowij, and Wollongong Ph.D. candidate Ashleigh Osborne conducted a detailed review of 27 extant studies on the chemical and uncovered some “fascinating insights” about its potential therapeutic value.

In a release, Green commented that CBD could provide direct neurological support for a range of conditions affecting the brain, from schizophrenia to dementia. “From this review, we found that CBD will not improve learning and memory in healthy brains, but may improve aspects of learning and memory in illnesses associated with cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer’s disease, as well as neurological and neuro-inflammatory disorders,” including hepatic encephalopathy, meningitis, sepsis, and cerebral malaria.

Green, who led the review, also noted that CBD may well be capable of reducing cognitive impairment that has been associated with THC, the main psychoactive component of cannabis, which has previously shown a potential to aggravate aspects of schizophrenia, anxiety, and other mental disorders.

Following the review, the researchers decided to put CBD’s potential for easing cognitive schizophrenia symptoms to the test with their own study using a rat model. With help from Senior Professor Xu-Feng Huang and Ph.D. candidate Ilijana Babic, what they found was that “chronic” administration of CBD seemed to attenuate the cognitive deficits and social withdrawal that often afflict persons with schizophrenia, which the team simulated in rats using prenatal poly I:C infection.

“We found that CBD was able to restore recognition and working memory, as well as social behavior, to normal levels,” Osborne said in a release. “These findings are interesting because they suggest that CBD may be able to treat some of the symptoms of schizophrenia that are seemingly resistant to existing medications. In addition, CBD treatment did not alter body weight or food intake, which are common side effects of antipsychotic drug treatment.”

Osborne also explained to ABC News Australia, “This is really important because current antipsychotic drugs don’t address the cognitive deficits, which approximately 80% of patients with schizophrenia experience.”

According to the Australian team, the results of their review and study indicate some promising possibilities for treating schizophrenia with CBD, but also that more scientific research is definitely in order.

“This is the first study to prove Cannabidiol can be used to treat symptoms of schizophrenia that aren’t addressed by current medications,” Osborne told ABC News. “These findings are really promising but further research is needed to see if these findings translate to people suffering from schizophrenia.”

She added, “Ultimately, we hope that these findings lead to new improved medications.”

According to a recent study on schizophrenia and cannabis use, people with a greater risk for schizophrenia are likelier than others to keep trying the plant for themselves in the meantime.

In recent years, cannabis has also shown promise as a treatment for Tourette Syndrome, characterized by involuntary physical or verbal tics that are often physically or socially painful to endure.

A preliminary study published this year provided a retrospective evaluation of cannabis’ effectiveness and tolerability in treating adults with Tourette Syndrome. Conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto with support from the Tourette Association of America, the study found that 18 of 19 participants were at least “much improved” after a regimen of inhaled cannabis, while tics scores for the whole group decreased by 60%.

As NORML reported, all of the study’s participants experienced “clinically significant symptom relief,” including reductions in irritability, impulsivity, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and rage outbursts. The drug was also well tolerated by the participants, with mostly minor side effects being reported.

Overall, the researchers wrote, “These study participants experienced substantial improvements in their symptoms, [which] is particularly striking given that almost all participants had failed at least one anti-tic medication trial. … In conclusion, cannabis seems to be a promising treatment option for tics and associated symptoms.”

As NORML pointed out, research has previously determined that oral doses of THC have helped to decrease tics and obsessive-compulsive behavior in patients with Tourette Syndrome by a hearty margin. Patients using inhaled cannabis, however, have “generally shown greater overall improvement.”

Given that cannabis and the chemicals it contains have demonstrated promise or proven effectiveness in treating such ailments as pain, nausea, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, epilepsy, and various symptoms thereof, many patients and practitioners are hoping that the Trump Administration will allow more research on the plant going forward.

In recent months, however, members of the administration have indicated a desire to rather crack down on the drug’s medicinal and recreational usage, at times due to the opinion–or, perhaps more accurately, the notion–that marijuana is not a medicine.

According to Merriam-Webster, a medicine is “a substance or preparation used in treating disease;” according to our own CDC, medicines are “used to treat diseases, manage conditions, and relieve symptoms.”

As the CDC points out, medicines can also contain a number of different drugs, and thereby pose different health risks depending on each patient. For example, over-the-counter (OTC) pain medicines like Tylenol and Excedrin contain the drug acetaminophen, which can easily be overdosed on (and/or do real liver damage) by doubling the dose once or twice, regardless of its interactions with other drugs, while over-dosing or incorrect use of OTC’s like Advil and Aleve, which contain drugs called NSAIDs, cause tens of thousands of hospitalizations each year, and thousands of deaths, though exact estimates vary.

Nevertheless, these drugs continue to be available as medicines because their perceived benefits are thought to outweigh the risks involved in taking them–an assessment which is critical for both doctors and drug manufacturers to perform, according to the FDA.

And since research and experts have consistently suggested that the potential benefits of cannabis would far outweigh the risks and side-effects involved–enough to warrant further study, in the very least–hopefully our elected officials and appointed administrators will realign their sense of the plant with science’s definition soon.

Janet Burns covers tech, culture, and other fun stuff from Brooklyn, NY. She also hosts the cannabis news podcast The Toke.


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Top 9 Active CBD Clinical Trials To Date – by Joe Powers

Top 9 Active CBD Clinical Trials To Date
by Joe Powers
What CBDs (Cannabidiols) Are Currently In Clinical Trials And What Results Are They Proving
As CBD (cannabidiol) comes into the light of the public eye, the curiosity of government researchers continues to grow. Through this growth of interest comes with it funding for real science and research into the mysteries of cannabis sativa and specifically, CBD Cannabidiol.

How many clinical trials are currently active?
Are potential participants able to sign up?
Will their clinical trials be recruiting soon?
Clinicaltrials.gov does an excellent job of organizing the data and presenting it in an easy to find and understand manner. On this website, you’re able to do advanced searches to locate clinical trials which are actively enrolling (cannabidiol) and will soon be recruiting (cannabidiol). Make sure you do also search for the search term CBD; actively enrolling (CBD) & soon recruiting (CBD). When you search for cannabidiol you’ll on receive 20+ results. While searching for CBD will yield 80+ results.

A few of the upcoming CBD clinical trials include:

Autistic Disorder
Anxiety
Chronic Pain
Epilepsy
Infantile Spasms
Lung Cancer
Multiple Sclerosis
Parkinsons
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Schizophrenia
And several more
As of now, there are 22+ active clinical trials researching the effects of CBD (cannabidiol).
A few of the 22+ conditions currently in active clinical trials are as follows:

Click here to see full CBD clinical trials list for either CBD or Cannabidiol search terms.

Cannabis Use Disorder
Effects Of CBD In Healthy Humans
Epilepsy; Drug Interaction, Pediatric, & Drug Resistant
Opiate Addiction
Sturge-Weber Syndrome
Seizures
Infantile Spasms
Advanced Parkinson’s Disease
Type 1 Diabetes
And more.
What results are they proving? What new information is currently available from new studies?
As of now, there are no results posted of any studies going on.
CUD (Cannabis Use Disorder)
First of all, the active clinical trial for cannabis use disorder started in March 2014. This study wants to investigate a “novel treatment” for those who want to quit cannabis and meet the criteria for moderate use. Stage 1 of the trial is scheduled to wrap up and collected its final data for the primary outcome July 2017. In the first stage, they will identify the MED (Most Effective Dose), by taking an oral CBD, to lower cannabis abuse. Next, in stage 2, they will then decide if the MED in stage 1 is an effective treatment for curing CUD.

Effects Of CBD In Healthy Humans
This particular clinical trial is studying healthy adults between the age of 18 – 55 years of age with 75 participants enrolled. Beginning in 2010 and is estimated to have all their primary data by July 2017. Most noteworthy, participants are injected with active Delta-9-THC (0.035mg/Kg) over a 20-minute time frame. This size of the dose is the same amount of THC you’d receive if you were to smoke about a half to a whole cannabis joint. What will be measured in this study are specific behaviors at time intervals of; 15,80, 240 days. The subjective effects to be studied involve perception alterations and effects of mental processes. Mental functions will be assessed using various visual & analog scales among others.

Epilepsy
There are currently three clinical trials researching the effects of CBD and epilepsy.
One clinical trial is investigating CBD with epileptic children between 1 and 18 years. Phase 1 is determining the optimal dose of CBD rich cannabis extract to treat Dravet syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy. High environmental climates and fever are two of the main stimulants triggering episodes. Gathering the primary data will take an initial 20 week and will continue to follow up for another 64 weeks. During this time, they will evaluate adverse effects and document side effects through questionnaires.

Second epilepsy and CBD clinical trials will be investigating the interactions between Clobazam and CBD. With the third and final CBD and epilepsy clinical trial involving CBD and drug resistant epilepsy with children 2 – 19.

Opiate Addiction
As opiate addiction study moves into phase 2, they will be gathering data on effectiveness while continuing to evaluate safety. Research here is focusing on utilizing CBD to modulate the craving for opiates by inhibiting drug-seeking behavior. This clinical trial is necessary because, despite the abundance of alternative therapies available to treat opioid dependency, most patients end up relapsing. The study set to complete in October 2017.

Seizures & Sturge-Weber Syndrome
SWS (Sturge-Weber Syndrome) is a rare neurological and skin disorder. Some children with this syndrome don’t have any symptoms while others have severe developmental delays and seizures. GW Pharmaceuticals Ltd. & Faneca 66 Foundation began clinical trials in December 2014 to determine the optimal dosage of CBD to treat SWS, a drug resistant form of epilepsy. They are currently in phase 2 and estimating trial completion in January 2018 while measuring the change in seizure frequency.

One more active seizure CBD clinical trial is an open-trial, in multiple locations, researching the long-term safety CBD with the treatment resistant seizure. Currently in phase 3 and estimated completion in December 2017

Infantile Spasms (IS)
The 9th and the final active CBD clinical trial is studying Infantile Spasms (IS) in children between 6 and 36 months of age. Infantile Spasms (IS) is described as a rare and terrible form of epilepsy that usually strikes children in their first year of life. There’s an even more urgent need for this trial because the currently available medicines are not helping and the children are remaining sick. Now, in phase 2 and will continue researching the safety and efficacy of COS (Cannabidiol Oral Solution) in treating IS.

As a result, there are 22+ active CBD clinical trials, 230+ completed clinical trials, and 110+ clinical trials either in open enrollment or getting ready to open up to recruiting for CBD clinical trials.

[Featured image credit- CannaSOS]

Joe Powers | August 28, 2017 at 12:06 pm | Tags: cannabidiol, Cannabis, CBD, Clinical Trials, Epilepsy, opiate addiction, Seizure | Categories: Health, Science | URL: http://wp.me/p8nEcz-zk


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CW Hemp, PlusCBD Oil, HempMeds (RHSO), Elixinol and CannazALL are the top 5 CBD brands online, according to a new report by Tampa, Florida-based Brightfield Group, a market research firm that specializes in the cannabis industry. The report (cost: $395) projects the hemp-derived CBD market will hit $1 billion by 2022, noting CBD sales hit $170 million in 2016 and suggesting 55% compound annual growth over the next five years will cause the market to crack the billion-dollar mark.


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Europe’s market potential for cannabidiol (CBD) is pegged at around €2 billion as a treatment for chronic diseases, according to a new report by nova-Institute and HempConsult (both of Germany), who probed the market for non-psychotropic CBD, increasingly in demand as a food supplement and pharmaceutical.